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A Next Step For Personalized Medicine? Vendor Brings Genomics To Ambulatory EHR

Posted on October 8, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Most physicians have some sense of the value personalized medicine can bring to their practice, but I doubt that many have ready access to the tools they’d need to harness its power.

In an effort to close that gap – and of course, to make its platform irreplaceable – a vendor serving medical practices has struck a deal giving physicians the ability to order genetic tests and leverage them to improve care.

The vendor, DrChrono, offers a suite of electronic systems for physicians, including an EHR which can be customized by bundling in affiliated apps. Its new partner is Genomind, a personalized medicine platform offering genetic testing for psychiatry practices.

Physicians using DrChrono will have access to two Genomind test kits, along with some analytics tools they can use to make use of the testing data.

One of the tests is Mindful DNA Professional, a genetic test used by clinicians to help them guide wellness decisions. The test targets aspects of a patient’s genetic details which could have an impact on overall health, such as variants suggesting that they could have sleep issues or a predisposition to anxiety, depression or impaired cognition.

DrChrono users will also have access to the Genecept Assay, the results of which can guide the treatment of psychiatric conditions. Once test results become available on the Genomind system, doctors can use its gene-drug-environmental interaction tool, the Genomind Drug Interaction Guide, to inform their treatment decisions. With the help of the Guide, clinicians can analyze the patient’s current medication regimen and flag gene-drug interactions.

An interesting side note to all of this is that the final test results from Genomind will be stored in the DrChrono information library for the patient and become part of the patient’s medical record.

Looked at one way, sharing the Genomind test results seems almost like a no-brainer in a world where casual genetic testing (think 23andMe) is becoming the norm. On the other, though, I don’t want to gloss over the fact that using genetic data to search for relatives is one thing and putting it into your personal medical record is quite another. It suggests that of consumer-driven demand for precision treatment is maturing, and that Genomind is on the right side of this trend.

This takes me back to DrChrono, which while not itself reinventing the wheel has struck a smart deal here. Not only has it brought a tool on board which could offer some benefit to physicians, its supporting the collection of information (genetic data) that patients are beginning to want. If DrChrono can give patients their genetic info via a decent portal, the company may find itself to be in demand with patients. Way to stay abreast of the times.

Better Performing Practices Invest in Communications

Posted on October 1, 2018 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He is currently an independent marketing consultant working with leading healthIT companies. Colin is a member of #TheWalkingGallery. His Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung.

MGMA’s Winning Strategies From Top Medial Groups report identifies better-performing practices have invested in: (1) New/upgraded EHRs; (2) Electronic communication systems; and (3) Upgraded coding and revenue cycle management systems.

The Medical Group Management Association (MGMA) released their Winning Strategies From Top Medical Groups report – on the morning of their annual conference. The report is based on data gathered from 3,000+ medical groups that were identified by MGMA as top-performers in at least one of four categories:

  1. Better-performing practices focus on using resources efficiently and create + stick to a financial plan.
  2. Better-performing practices are those whose providers and staff successfully contributed to earned revenue for the practice.
  3. Better-performing practices have lower operating costs as a percentage of revenue and manage their revenue cycle better.
  4. Better-performing practices report on quality metrics while also excelling in at least one other category.

According to the report, being a better-performer reaps significant benefits.

  • Better performing independently-owned surgical specialty practices have 20% lower operating costs vs other practices
  • Better performing primary care practices have 8.6% greater net income per physician vs other practices
  • Better performing practices collect 10% more accounts receivable in the first 30 days vs other practices

Overall, the report identified three key strategies that better-performing practices pursue:

  1. Building an engaging, patient-focused culture
  2. Focusing on long-term, strategic progress
  3. Constantly investing in improving operations

What was the most surprising result in the report? Todd Evenson, Chief Operating Officer of MGMA had this to say “I found it surprising how much more productive Better Performers were in terms of Work Relative Value Units (RVUs). Better-performing non-surgical specialty practices, for example, were found to have an average of 9,115 RVUs per physician compared to 7,300 for all other practices. The report highlights having the right staff, the right technology and the right people can make a big difference.”

For me, the most interesting aspect of the report was where HealthIT investments were being made. The report identifies that better-performers had or were planning to invest in:

  1. New or upgraded EHRs to support better patient communication, better provider experience and workflow efficiency
  2. Electronic communication systems (like secure texting) for use between providers and with patients
  3. Upgraded billing/coding software and revenue cycle management systems

I did not expect to see communication so prominent in the top Health IT priorities. For many years communication has been an afterthought. It is encouraging to see that in 2018 practice leaders are putting an emphasis on tools and systems to help bring the people who are delivering care closer to peers and closer to patients.

“The reality is, any practice can achieve top performance when the people within it make a sustained effort to do more of the right things well,” said Ken Hertz, Principal MGMA Consultant. “We developed this report not only to give practices strategies to get the most from their business but to show them that these efforts pay off—for practices and patients alike. When practices invest in improving their business, patients are more efficiently served, increasing patient satisfaction and health outcomes, and improving patient retention rates. It’s a feedback loop that benefits everyone.”

The Winning Strategies From Top Medical Groups report is available exclusively to MGMA members.

Practice’s EMR Implementation Drove Up Costs For Six Months

Posted on September 28, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Everyone knows that providers incur EMR-related costs until well after it is implemented. According to a new study, in fact, one medical incurred higher costs for six months after its implementation.

The study, which appeared recently in The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery, calculated the impact of an EMR implementation on labor costs and productivity at an outpatient orthopedic clinic. The researchers conducting the study used time-driven activity-based costing to estimate EMR-related expenses.

To conduct the study, the research team timed 143 patients prospectively throughout their clinic visit, both before implementation of the hospital system-wide EMR and then again at two months, six months and two years after the implementation.

The researchers found that after the first two months, total labor costs per patient had shot up from $36.88 to $46.04.

One reason for the higher costs was a growth in the amount of time attending surgeons spent per patient, which went up from 9.38 to 10.97 minutes, increasing surgeon cost from $21 to $27.01. In addition, certified medical assistants for spending what time assessing patients, with the time spent almost tripling from 3.42 to 9.1 minutes.

On top of all of this, providers were spending more than twice as much time documenting patient encounters as they had before, up to 7.6 minutes from 3.3 minutes prior to the implementation.

By the six-month mark, however, labor costs per patient had largely returned to their previous levels, settling at $38.75 compared with $36.88 prior to the installation, and expense which remain at the same level when calculated at two years after the EMR implementation.

However, providers were spending even more time documenting encounters than they had before the rolling, with time climbing to 8.43 minutes or roughly 5 minutes more than prior to the introduction of the EMR. Not only that, providers were spending less time interacting with patients, falling to 10.03 as compared with 14.65 minutes in the past.

Sadly, we might have been able to predict this outcome. Clearly, the clinic’s EMR implementation has burdened its providers and further minimized time the providers spend with their patients. This, unfortunately, is more of a rule than an exception.

So why did the ortho practice even bother? It’s hard to say. The study doesn’t say what the practice hoped to accomplish by putting the EMR in place, or whether it met those goals. Given that the system was still in place after two years one would hope that it was providing some form of value.

Truthfully, I’d much rather have learned about what the clinic actually got for its investment than how long it took to get everyone trained up and using it. To be fair, though, this data might have some relevance to the hospital systems that manage a broad spectrum of medical practices, and that’s worth something.

A Vote In Favor Of Using Scribes

Posted on September 26, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Over the past few years, using scribes to complete medical documentation in EHRs has gotten mixed reviews. Some analyses have found that scribe services were too expensive to justify the investment, while others have concluded that the use of scribes can make a meaningful impact on revenue and improve physician productivity.

This month, a new paper has been published whose results fall into the plus column. The small study, which appears in JAMA Internal Medicine, looked at the use of scribes among 18 primary care physicians.

To conduct the study, researchers looked at physicians at two medical center facilities within an integrated healthcare system, gathering data between July 1, 2016 and June 30, 2017.

The research team assigned PCPs randomly to two groups, one with and the without scribes, for 3-month periods, switching physicians between the with and without groups every three months. At the end of each three-month period, the PCPs filled out a six-question survey which collected their perceptions of documentation burdens and visit interactions.

In addition to capturing PCP perceptions of scribe use, researchers also collected objective data, including time spent on EHR activity. They also surveyed patients of participating PCPs to gather data on the patients’ perceptions of visit quality.

When all was said and done, the research team found that scribed periods were associated with less self-reported after-hours EHR documentation work.

Researchers also found that when they used scribes, PCPs were more likely to report spending more than 75% of the visit interacting with the patient and less than 25% of the visit on the computer. In addition, physicians were more likely to finish their encounter documentation by the end of the next business day during scribed periods.

What’s more, 62.4% of patients said that scribes had a positive effect on the visits, while just 2.4% said they had a negative effect.

The researchers’ take away from all this was that the use of medical scribes could be one strategy for improving physician workflow and primary care visit quality.

As I noted previously, other research has drawn similar conclusions. For example, a study published in 2015 (which included the involvement of scribe provider ScribeAmerica) found that scribe use at the two hospitals was linked to an improved Case Mix Index which ultimately led to gains of about $12,000 per patient. Meanwhile, inpatient physicians were able to cut time spent the chart updates by about 10 minutes per patient on average.

Having been over arguments for and against scribe use, my personal conclusion is that working with them can be a worthwhile investment if doing so is a good fit for the physicians involved, but doesn’t work in all cases.

Ultimately, it seems that there’s too much variation between settings in which scribes could be used to make a single blanket statement about their benefits. I guess we won’t be drawing grand conclusions about scribe pros and cons anytime soon.

EHR Error Messages – Fun Friday

Posted on September 21, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Sometimes these Fun Friday series of humorous blog posts hit a little too close to home. I’m pretty sure this week’s post will feel a little too personal for many readers. However, when I saw it, I couldn’t help but laugh and so I thought many of you might enjoy the humor as well. First, read the error message that Dr. Hayes share and then his question in the tweet below.

The nice thing is that most EHR are moving to the cloud. You don’t get this message in the cloud. Instead, you get 404 error messages and spinning wheels. Ok, you may never get away from these messages.

Have a great weekend and may you enjoy a weekend free of error messages like this.

Don’t Be The Last Practice To “Get” Digital Health

Posted on September 14, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Physicians, are you savvy about the digital health technologies your patients use? Do you make it easy for them to interact with you digitally and share the health data they generate? If not, you need to move ahead and get there already. While you may be satisfied with sidestepping the whole subject, patients aren’t, a recent report suggests.

As you probably know already a growing number of patients, most notably millennials, are integrating digital health tools into their everyday lives.

Research from Rock Health, which surveyed about 4,000 consumers, found that the share of respondents using at least one digital tool (such as telemedicine, digital health tracking apps or wearables) hit 87% last year. To get a sense of how impressive this is, bear in mind that just five years ago, only a tiny handful of consumers had given any of these tools a try.

What’s also of note is that some of these consumers were willing to skip insurance and pay out of pocket for digital care. One particularly clear example of this involves live video telemedicine; Sixty-nine percent of consumers who paid out of pocket for such consults said they were “extremely satisfied” with the experience.

Patients who reported having a chronic health condition seemed less likely to use digital tools to track their health metrics. Case in point: When it came to blood pressure tracking, just 11% captured this data with a digital app or journal. However, this may reflect the higher-than-average of those diagnosed with elevated pressures, a senior population with a lower level of tech sophistication.

Lest all of this sound intimidating, there’s at least some good news here. Apparently, a full 86% of respondents said that they’d be willing to share data with their physician, a much larger share than those who would exchange data with a health plan (58%) or pharmacy (52%). In other words, they trust you, which is a big asset under these circumstances.

If you want to dive into digital health more deeply, here’s a few obvious places to start:

  • Link in-person and telemedicine visits: Rock Health found that a whopping 92% pf respondents who had an in-person visit first were satisfied with their video visit.
  • Be vigilant about data security: Almost 9 out of 10 consumers participating in the survey said that they would be willing to share data with you. Don’t lose that trust to a health data breach; it will be hard if not impossible to get it back.
  • Bring chronically-ill seniors on board: While this group may not be terribly inclined to digitize their healthcare, doing so can help you treat them more effectively, so you’ll probably want to make that point up front.

Like it or not, wearables, fitness bands, mobile health apps, and other digital health tools have arrived. It’s no longer a matter of if you take advantage of them, but when and how. Don’t be the last practice in your neighborhood that just doesn’t get it.

It’s Time To Work Together On Technology Research

Posted on September 12, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Bloggers like myself see a lot of data on the uptake of emerging technologies. My biggest sources are market research firms, which typically provide the 10,000-foot view of the technology landscape and broad changes the new toys might work in the healthcare industry. I also get a chance to read some great academic research, primarily papers focused on niche issues within a subset of health IT.

I’m always curious to see which new technologies and applications are rising to the top, and I’m also intrigued by developments in emerging sub-disciplines such as blockchain for patient data security.

However, I’d argue that if we’re going to take the next hill, health IT players need to balance research on long-term adoption trends with a better understanding of how clinicians actually use new technologies. Currently, we veer between the micro and macro view without looking at trends in a practical manner.

Let’s consider the following information I gathered from a recent report from market research firm Reaction Data.   According to the report, which tabulated responses from a survey of about 100 healthcare leaders, five technologies seem to top the charts as being set to work changes in healthcare.

The list is topped by telemedicine, which was cited by 29% of respondents, followed by artificial intelligence (20%), interoperability (15%), data analytics (13%) and mobile data (11%).

While this data may be useful to leaders of large organizations in making mid- to long-range plans, it doesn’t offer a lot of direction as to how clinicians will actually use the stuff. This may not be a fatal flaw, as it is important to have some idea what trends are headed, but it doesn’t do much to help with tactical planning.

On the flip side, consider a paper recently published by a researcher with Google Brain, the AI team within Google. The paper, by Google software engineer Peter Lui, describes a scheme in which providers could use AI technology to speed their patient documentation process.

Lui’s paper describes how AI might predict what a clinician will say in patient notes by digging into the content of prior notes on that patient. This would allow it to help doctors compose current notes on the fly.  While Lui seems to have found a way to make this work in principle, it’s still not clear how effective his scheme would be if put into day-to-day use.

I’m well aware that figuring out how to solve a problem is the work of vendors more than researchers. I also know that vendors may not be suited to look at the big picture in the way of outside market researcher firms can, or to conduct the kind of small studies the fuel academic research.

However, I think we’re at a moment in health IT that demands high-level research collaboration between all of the stakeholders involved.  I truly hate the word “disruptive” by this point, but I wouldn’t know how else to describe options like blockchain or AI. It’s worth breaking down a bunch of silos to make all of these exciting new pieces fit together.

2019 CPT Codes To Cover Remote Monitoring And Digital Care Coordination

Posted on September 10, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

The American Medical Association has released CPT code set changes 2019, and among them are some new options specific to digital health practices.

While providing such codes is a no-brainer — and if anything, the AMA is late to the party – it’s still a bit of noteworthy news, as it could have an impact on the progress of digital care.  After all, the new codes to make it easier to capture the value of some activities providers may be self-funding at present. They can also help physicians track the amount of time they spend on remote monitoring and digital care coordination more easily.

The 2019 release includes 335 changes to the existing code set, such as new and revised codes for adaptive behavior analysis, skin biopsy and central nervous system assessments. The new release also includes five new digital care-related codes.

The 2019 code set includes three new remote patient monitoring codes meant to capture how clinicians connect with patients at home and gather data from care management and coordination, and two new “interprofessional” Internet consult codes for reporting on care coordination discussions between a consulting physician and the treating physician

It’s good to see the AMA follow up with this issue. To date, there have been few effective ways to capture the benefits of interactive care online or even via email exchanges between physician and patient.

As a result, providers have been trapped in a vicious circle in which virtual care doesn’t get documented adequately, payers don’t reimburse because they don’t have the data needed to evaluate its effectiveness and providers don’t keep offering such services because they don’t get paid for performing them.

With the emergence of just five new CPT codes, however, things could begin to change for the better. For example, if physicians are getting paid to consult digitally with their peers on patient care, that gives vendors incentives to support these activities with better technology. This, in turn, can produce better results. Now we’re talking about a virtuous circle instead.

Obviously, it will take a lot more codes to document virtual care processes adequately. The introduction of these five new codes represents a very tentative first step at best. Still, it’s good to see the AMA avoid the chicken-and egg-problem and simply begin to lay the tracks for better-documented digital care. We’ve got to start somewhere.

 

Patient Directed Health Data Exchange on The Blockchain

Posted on September 7, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve long been friends with Dr. Tom Giannulli who most of you will probably have known as the CMO of Kareo. I first met Dr. Tom back when he created what I would call the first iPad optimized EHR interface back when Dr. Tom was at Epocrates and before they sold that EHR to Kareo. Needless to say, Dr. Tom is the kind of guy that likes to sit on the cutting edge of technology and how it applies to healthcare. So, it was no surprise to me when he came to me with his patient directed health data exchange called PatientDirected.io which is built on the blockchain.

While a lot of people talk about blockchain and theories about how blockchain could help healthcare, a lot of what people were doing was just talk. What I like about Dr. Tom and PatientDirected.io is that they just put out a video demo of a patient chart being requested from Kareo by the patient and then the patient sending that chart to Epic. Check it out to see what I mean:

Many of you that watch this demo might be asking. How is this on the blockchain? That’s one of the things that many people don’t understand about blockchain. If it’s done right, you won’t know anything about the blockchain. However, the blockchain can do things like creating smart contracts with providers which can create trusted connections. The blockchain is distributed, so your data isn’t stored on a central server that’s owned and controlled by PatientDirected.io. Basically, blockchain has a number of benefits, but it’s the “Intel Inside” and so it’s not something you should see as an end user, but it could provide some great benefits.

I also like that PatientDirected.io isn’t trying to reinvent the wheel. They’re using trusted third party applications like Verato to handle their master patient index and for verifying patients identity. There’s a lot more to explore when it comes to identity management, but it’s smart to work with companies that are doing this all across healthcare.

I was also impressed with the detailed sharing permissions that were available in PatientDirected.io. At first glance, a part of me wonders if it’s too complex for most patients. However, as long as the options are there, the interface can adapt to allow for specific patient preferences when it comes to data sharing. Of course, it’s nice that all of the sharing of this data will be tracked on the blockchain.

The key to all of this working for me is the integration with the EHR vendor. It looks like it’s using Direct to handle the messaging to the EHR vendor and back. This is good because I believe all certified EHR (which is pretty much all of them) have direct messaging built in. Some have integrated it better than others, but they all have this capability. My big concern with it though is whether what’s being shared by EHR vendors using Direct is enough data. And will that data that gets sent from one EHR to another appear in a format that’s useful to the receiving physician? If it’s not, then it doesn’t solve much of anything. Plus, I wonder what happens when a doctor gets a record request and doesn’t respond. This is especially true for EHR vendors who haven’t integrated Direct into the core EHR workflow. Will this take a culture change to not leave patients waiting for records that will never come?

As you could imagine, PatientDirected.io has an ICO offering on StartEngine.com. Looks like it just got started, but there’s an opportunity to buy their tokens if you’re interested and believe they’re on to something special.

I think there is a space for a patient directed health information exchange assuming we can make the exchange of information between disparate providers very simple. There are still some challenges for patients when it comes to getting access to their health information, but the law is clear that patients should have access to their health information. Now we just need the user interfaces to be as simple as clicking a button like is demonstrated in the video above and we’ll see much more patient directed health information exchange.

The Ambulatory EHR Market with Raul Villar, Jr. CEO of AdvancedMD

Posted on September 5, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The ambulatory EHR market is near to my heart since that’s where I started when I entered this world of healthcare IT. My first job was implementing an EHR in a small ambulatory practice. As regular readers know, I’ve commented on how the independent small practice is in trouble. I’m not suggesting this is what I’d like to happen or what should happen, but there are certainly a lot of challenging pressures on small practices.

Along with these pressures, the ambulatory EHR market is extremely different today than it was 5-10 years ago. The $36 billion funded meaningful use era of EHR adoption was what I call the golden age of EHR. We could argue whether it was a golden calf or not, but from a market standpoint, the meaningful use money fueled adoption of the EHR.

Today’s ambulatory EHR market is very different. That’s why we were excited to sit down with Raul Villar, Jr. CEO of AdvancedMD to talk about his perspective on the ambulatory EHR market. We also talk with him about the evolution of AdvancedMD as it went from ownership by ADP to now being owned by Marlin Equity Partners and what those changes mean for their customers. Plus, we go over AdvancedMD’s acquisition of NueMD and what their strategy is behind the acquisition. Finally, we talk about EHR vendors as a platform and where he sees AdvancedMD taking their platform in the future.

If you’re interested in the ambulatory EHR market or in AdvancedMD, you’ll enjoy this interview with Raul Villar, Jr.

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