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Hospitals, Doctors And Patients Impacted By Unplanned EHR Downtime

Posted on June 18, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

EHRs are going to crash and go offline from time to time. But are physicians and hospitals prepared to deal with the fallout when this happens? The answer seems to be “maybe.”

Of course, physicians and hospitals have plenty of reasons to avoid EHR downtime.

For one thing, EHR crashes can have a major impact on care delivery. After all, without EHRs, physicians may have no access to patient data, which could lead to care complications or adverse events.

Also, downtime adds addition pain (and expense) to the situation. According to one estimate, unplanned system failures can cost $634 per physician per hour. Meanwhile, according to Dean Sitting of the University of Texas, a large hospital may lose as much as $1 million per hour when their EHR is down. Those are scary numbers.

Unfortunately, despite the costs, strain to the hospital operations and consumer complaints arising from downtime, many hospitals refuse to invest in preventive technologies such as a backup data center, arguing that they’re just too expensive. As a result, hospitals can be offline for a long time when their EHR system crashes, which typically has a nasty ripple effect.

One example of how EHR downtime affects hospital operations comes from Sutter Health, the largest health system in northern California, whose EHR went offline for more than 24 hours in May. The crash took place when a fire-suppression system was activated in the system’s data center.

During the shutdown, Sutter hospitals followed a series of steps often used by its peers, such as cutting elective surgeries, transporting patients to other hospitals and discharging patients who weren’t very sick. They also switched over to paper records. But despite these efforts, Sutter still faced some problems that weren’t addressed by its plans.

For one thing, younger doctors were thrown a curve ball, as many had never worked with paper charts. This alone gummed up the works during the downtime episode. There were no signs that these doctors made any mistakes due to using paper records, but the risk was there.

Then there were the effects on patients – and some were ugly. For example, when Santa Clara resident Susan Harkema’s father died, she called Sutter Health’s Hospital of the Valley to arrange for removal of his body to a crematorium. According to a story appearing in San Jose Mercury News, Harkema tried a hotline and backup numbers but couldn’t reach anyone due to the outage. It took 8 hours for a hospice nurse to arrive and collect the body, the newspaper reported.

Another patient tweeted that they had to go out of the Sutter system for critical care, which left the treating physicians without care history to review. “It was stressful and scary, and we still aren’t sure we have a successful outcome,” they said.

The net of all of this seems to be that hospital downtime policies could use more than a few tweaks, and more importantly, a better failsafe protecting EHRs from going offline in the first place. Sure, no EHR system is perfect, and crashes are inevitable, but providers can be better prepared.

Should Doctors Offer Concierge IT Security Services?

Posted on December 20, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Today, just for fun, I’m gonna start with a thesis and work my way back to see if you agree with its foundations. My conclusion: With the cost of IT security services climbing, the cost of care coordination rising and practice income in many cases remaining relatively level, group practices will have to change their business model substantially.

Specifically, though this may sound insane, I’m suggesting that they may have to begin charging patients for beyond-the-call-of-duty security efforts.

Of course, as we all know, practices are required to offer at least a minimal level of security protection as specified in rules like those in HIPAA. Necessary though it is, it’s a pricey exercise for many groups.

Even so, cold economics may push them to cut data protection further. Given that care coordination will be necessary to meet population health goals, and that quality monitoring and management are indispensable, they may see security as the most dispensable of these spending options.

As the need for care coordination staff, quality management and other necessities of value-based care rise, paying for IT security services will become almost impossible to pay for without borrowing from another source.

That source can come from an internal budgetary resource, such as money allocated for routine general expenses, or other overhead, such as salaries for existing staff members, neither of which is desirable. Of course, there’s also the possibility of obtaining a line of credit, but that’s arguably even worse for the future of the company.

But since no medical organization can go entirely without IT security protection, it will have to find the funds to pay for it somehow. Given that any of the possibilities discussed above will drain the practice and possibly cut its finances to the bone, but something will have to give.

At this point, many practices decide to sell their group to a hospital or health system. That’s certainly a legitimate way of taking on unmanageable levels of overhead and getting access to far more infrastructure options and financial resources.

But if that’s not the direction you want to take, here’s off-ball idea for recapturing some IT security revenue: concierge security services.

While every patient’s data needs to be protected, obviously, you could offer concierge security patients access to extra layers of security attentiveness, such as a private IT staff or to answer any data privacy and security questions they might have about the practice, hospital where they are seen or other entity.

Toss in a special “security report” (in all candor, probably info they could’ve read in any trade magazine), personalized to patient needs, and a free zip drive with secured copies of their data and you’ll have them hooked.

If this worked, and I’m not suggesting that it necessarily would, it could help carry the cost of mundane IT security services. What do you think? Would this model have a chance?

Thoughts on Practice Fusion Raising $70 Million

Posted on September 24, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Today, Practice Fusion announced that they have just closed a $70 million round of funding. This series D round of funding brings Practice Fusion’s total funding to $134 million and a valuation estimated at $700 million. The round was led by Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, OrbiMed Advisors, and Deerfield Management Company.

We’d heard that this round was close almost 2 months ago. I’m not sure what took them so long to finally close the round. I also found it interesting in this Forbes article about the funding round that “Practice Fusion leads vendors this year in acquiring Allscripts’ former customers.” I have a feeling Aprima might have something to say about that.

In that same article, Practice Fusion declined to disclose revenues, but Ryan Howard suggested that he expects Practice Fusion revenues to triple next year. Then, it was suggested in the article that payments from labs connected to Practice Fusion customers would make up a significant source of revenue. You might remember that Practice Fusion lost one revenue stream when Kareo decided to launch their own free EHR. Practice Fusion has since rolled out 3 new billing companies and so they could have made up that revenue.

The article also suggests that revenue is available from Pharma for mining the Practice Fusion data for insights. Then, they’ve always talked about the potential for pharma advertising in the Free EHR. I also had someone suggest to me recently that Practice Fusion could be making money off of selling leads to the various healthcare education companies out there. Considering the number of emails I get from these healthcare education companies, they definitely have money to spend on targeted leads.

The question I’ve asked for many years isn’t whether Practice Fusion has created value. No doubt their current user base and data set has value. The question that remains is whether they’ve created a company that merits a $700 million valuation and whether the $134 million investment will yield a quality return. Plus, can Practice Fusion build the company’s revenue while still maintaining physicians’ trust in Practice Fusion. They now have $70 million in funding to find out.

2014 Health IT Spending to Pass $34 Billion

Posted on August 30, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Healthcare IT spending will increase to more than $34.5 billion in 2014, according to a new report from a Hampton, N.H.-based research and consulting firm.

Technology Business Research Inc. says that the spending will come as payers and providers look to build infrastructure modernization that meets regulatory mandates such as Meaningful Use of electronic health records (EHRs) under the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act and the transition to ICD-10. –Source

We certainly all knew that health IT spending was up. I’m sure that much of the spending is driven by the various government programs like meaningful use and ICD-10. The article linked above had one survey respondent say that their ICD-10 budget was $2.5 million. I expect this health IT spending trend will continue. Although, we’re entering a different category of customer going forward.

I wonder how that spending is broken out between enterprise spending and consumer health IT.

Modernizing Medicine EHR Vendor Raises $14 Million

Posted on August 20, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Modernizing Medicine®, the creator of the Electronic Medical Assistant® (EMA™), a cloud-based specialty-specific electronic medical record (EMR) system, announced today that it has received $14 million from Summit Partners, a global growth equity investor. –Source

I’ve been a big fan of Modernizing Medicine since I first came across them. Their approach to EHR is very smart and very different than many of the EHR software out there. They’re extremely focused on the specialties that work well with their visual method of documentation and that documentation method is something unique.

I’ll be interested to see if Modernizing Medicine plans to use this $14 million to expand beyond their current specialties or whether they plan to stay as a specialty specific EHR. I’m a big fan of specialty specific EHR software and so I hope that it’s the later. You have to compromise so many things when you expand an EHR to support so many different specialties. The number of doctors still not using Modernizing Medicine’s EMA EMR is still large enough for them to do very well.

Intuit Plans to Sell Intuit Health Group

Posted on July 3, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I was really intrigued by the news today that Intuit was planning to sell off Intuit Health Group. Intuit had been making some big purchases in healthcare, so it’s amazing to see them doing an about face. Here’s an excerpt from their press release about the change of strategy:

“These decisions are the remaining foundational pieces that focus our organization on our biggest opportunities as we execute our global connected services strategy,” said Brad Smith, Intuit president and chief executive officer. “We’ve evolved from a portfolio of business units to an ecosystem of products and services with unique interdependencies. Working together, these assets create amazing opportunities to solve important customer problems while building durable competitive advantage.”

And here’s an excerpt that discusses their plans for the Intuit Health Group:

Intuit also plans to sell the Intuit Health Group. While Intuit had considered healthcare a potential growth opportunity, structural shifts in the market have evolved in such a way that the business no longer fits within the refocused strategy, Smith said. The Intuit Health assets will be a better fit for an organization with a stronger focus on the healthcare industry.

This announcement is also interesting in light of the recent announcement from Kareo that they’d partnered with an Intuit company DemandForce. It seems that Intuit will still have a healthcare presence, but only when their product works across all industries. This is actually my concern for the Kareo and DemandForce partnership. I think that DemandForce will likely be overwhelming for many practices. Plus, many will wonder why DemandForce has features that don’t make sense for healthcare. Yes, we’re a little particular in healthcare, aren’t we? Kareo says they have 20,000 medical providers, so they’ll realize pretty quickly if practices like DemandForce or not.

I’ll be interested to see which company purchases the Intuit Health Group. There are probably a lot of companies that would love it, but I’m not sure if Intuit’s going to be willing to offer a great price.

EHR Consolidation and EHR Investment News

Posted on June 18, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

A couple big announcements came out this week that are continuing to shake up the EHR market. Most people consider this a really good thing when you look at the 300+ EHR companies in the market today. Most see this as unhealthy and a real issue for healthcare. No doubt it causes problems, not the least of which is the paradox of choice.

The first announcement was that Vitera Healthcare Solutions acquired SuccessEHS. Vitera is the new name for the SAGE EHR which they bought from Sage Software in 2011 for those tracking the EHR histories.

In the press release it says that the combined organizations serve “more than 10,500 medical organizations and over 415,000 medical professionals nationwide — including more than 85,000 physicians.” I was also interested to see Vitera’s emphasis on expanding their customer base in CHCs, Student Health Centers, HIV/AIDS Clinics, and FQHC.

I asked the company if there were any plans to sunset one of the competing EHR software platforms. They responded that they “plan to keep both EHR systems and keep developing both of them.” Of course, the acquisition was just announced, so that doesn’t mean in 3-6 months they may compare the EHR systems and make a different decision in the future.

The second announcement was CareCloud EHR raising $20 million. That brings CareCloud’s total funding to $44 million. Ever since I first met Albert Santalo, CEO of CareCloud, he said that he wasn’t looking for the early exit. Instead, he wanted to build CareCloud into a long term company. I expect this extra $20 million will let him and CareCloud really swing for the fences.

Also, I literally just got an email from another EHR vendor that’s in the process of being acquired. I can’t say who the company is until it’s official, but it seems that EHR consolidation is happening. Either that or the companies are taking on funding to try and last for the long term.

VentureHealth Launches New Crowdfunding Platform for Healthcare

Posted on May 24, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I was recently sent the press release (embedded below) about a new healthcare crowdfunding platform called VentureHealth. I’ve long thought that healthcare is one of the areas that could benefit from Crowdfunding the most. Largely because many patients (the crowd) have an interest in solving big problems in healthcare. So, the crowd could come together to help fund solutions to the world’s most deadly and pernicious diseases.

However, VentureHealth takes a bit of a different approach to Crowdfunding in Healthcare. Instead of focusing on patients funding healthcare entrepreneurs (which isn’t really possible yet because of crowdfunding laws), they are focused on enabling accredited investors who want to invest in healthcare startups. This is a smart idea because many doctors likely fit into the accredited investor category.

Unfortunately, having accredited investors is the only way to do crowdfunding today. However, I think this could be a good step for healthcare. If you can get a crowd of doctors backing innovation in healthcare, then you’re more likely to see success.

We’ll see how VentureHealth does over time, but it’s cool that they also announced in the press release below that the helped Channel Medsystems raise part of a series B round of funding. They also have a couple exits listed on their portfolio page including the popular BodyMedia. I’ll be interested to see how Venture Health does over time.

VentureHealth Launches New Model for Funding Healthcare Innovations 

Individual Investors Can Now Tap Into Previously Inaccessible Life Sciences Deals 

San Jose, Calif. – May 17, 2013 – VentureHealth, an online healthcare investment portal for accredited investors, today announced a new model for equity crowdfunding.  Focused on innovations that dramatically improve clinical outcomes, VentureHealth is the first equity crowdfunding portal founded by professional investors.  The investment platform offers qualified investors access to life sciences deals that traditionally were reserved for venture capitalists.

VentureHealth is led by a seasoned team with extensive success in the healthcare industry.  Mir Imran, Co-Founder and Managing Director, is a prolific medical innovator who has founded more than 20 life sciences companies and holds more than 200 patents.  Mir is also the founder of InCube Labs, a multi-disciplinary research lab that develops breakthrough medical technologies, and InCube Ventures, a life sciences venture fund.  Andrew Farquharson, Co-Founder and Managing Director of VentureHealth, is an investor and entrepreneur with two decades of experience building, restructuring and acquiring companies in life sciences.  A Harvard MBA, Andrew is also a founding member of InCube Ventures and an advisor to InCube Labs.  Talat Imran, the third Co-Founder and Managing Director, is an accomplished entrepreneur in the world of digital media.

“Venture capital for early stage life sciences companies has dried up in the last few years, and promising companies are always looking for investors.  VentureHealth has the potential to change how healthcare innovations are funded, which is a win for both entrepreneurs and investors,” said Mir Imran, Co-Founder and Managing Director.

“We founded VentureHealth so that physicians and other accredited investors can invest in the most compelling biomedical innovations,” said Andrew Farquharson, Co-Founder and Managing Director. “This model gives individuals access to high-quality deals, investing on terms offered to professional VCs.  It’s a paradigm shift and, if we’re successful, this could change the landscape for biomedical financing.”

VentureHealth is also announcing today that it raised $875,000 as part of a Series B round for Channel Medsystems, a start-up developing next generation cryoablation technologies.

“We love this new approach,” said Dan Burnett, Founder of Channel Medsystems. “VentureHealth is very attractive for companies like ours because it creates new financing options, and makes the whole funding ecosystem less VC dependent. That is a very big deal to entrepreneurs.”

In launching the online portal, VentureHealth is able to expand the community of investors while offering a limited number of carefully selected investment opportunities at any given time.

Astro Tellerserial entrepreneur and scientist who oversees Google[x]Google’s audacious ideas lab and “moonshot factory,” is not affiliated with VentureHealth but sees the potential of the model.  “Democratizing access to private markets is a powerful concept, and VentureHealth gets us a step closer to this vision.  It’s opening doors for individual investors, giving them access to deals they wouldn’t be able to participate in otherwise.  Even more interesting, it’s giving these investors a forum to interact and engage with the community.  There’s no doubt that 100 qualified people evaluating a deal make a better decision than one individual investor.”

Registered potential investors can log into www.venturehealth.com to see the most current offerings and to sign up to receive notifications when new investments become available. Those seeking life science investment opportunities must understand the risks associated with equity investments and are encouraged to consider investment diversification.

# # #

About VentureHealth

VentureHealth is an online venture fund platform for accredited investors who want access to breakthrough opportunities in the $2.5 trillion US healthcare sector.  Based in Silicon Valley, the firm was founded by professional investors with strong track records, who are passionate about improving healthcare. The team vets investments based on its deep experience in company building, and is incentivized by the quality of deals, not quantity. The time has come for offline fundraising to move online. For more information please visit www.VentureHealth.com.

AthenaHealth (NASDAQ: ATHN) Acquires Epocrates (Nasdaq: EPOC)

Posted on January 7, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

It was just announced that AthenaHealth plans to acquire Epocrates. This is a big move by AthenaHealth and a really smart one. Here are the details of the agreement for AthenaHealth to acquire Epocrates from the press release:

The board of directors of each of athenahealth and Epocrates has agreed to a price of $11.75 per share, in cash, for an aggregate purchase price of approximately $293 million. The purchase price represents a 22 percent premium over the closing price per share of Epocrates on NASDAQ on Friday, January 4, 2013. This is an all-cash offer for all outstanding shares of Epocrates’ common stock, and athenahealth intends to finance this acquisition using available cash and funds available from its existing credit facility. The closing of the transaction is subject to the approval of Epocrates shareholders and other customary closing conditions and is currently expected to occur early in the second quarter of 2013. Epocrates shareholders representing approximately 17.5% of the outstanding common stock have agreed to vote their shares in favor of the transaction.

Of course, there are still a number of regulatory hurdles that must be overcome to make the transaction final, but this looks like it’s going to happen. Considering Epocrates stock price was so low after their initial IPO, this isn’t really a surprise. Plus, once Epocrates shut down their EHR business it presented a great opportunity for another EHR vendor to come in and capitalize on Epocrates relationships with the doctors. In fact, Jonathan Bush describes the value of the Epocrates brand really well:

“I have been an admirer of Epocrates since it first emerged and have watched the company grow consistently, one app download at a time, as it has cemented itself into the consciousness of America’s physicians. No other company has been able to replicate the brand awareness, familiarity, and trust that Epocrates has across the clinical mobile user base. We are confident that we can provide Epocrates with the stewardship and resources it needs to grow and develop within health care, and that Epocrates’ capabilities are going to mesh exceptionally well with athenahealth’s cloud-based physician and patient services.”

I’ll be interested to see how AthenaHealth chooses to integrate the Epocrates knowledge base within its EHR and how they use the Epocrates relationship to sale their EHR to doctors. Will the Jonathan Bush cloud mantra take hold in the Epocrates culture? I’ll be interested to watch that transition.

ImagineMD EHR Closes Doors and Amazing Charts Acquired

Posted on November 19, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

A lot of activity lately in the EHR world and I think this is just the beginning. ImagineMD posted an “Important Notice” (quoted at the bottom of this post) on their website that said that they’re no longer providing ImagineMD services. The interesting thing is that a respected EHR consultant that I know absolutely loved the Imagine MD EHR. This guy had worked with hundreds of EHR software, so he knew the difference. Sadly, as often happens in business it’s not enough to have a great product. You also have to be able to market that product well. Looks like ImagineMD went out with their heads held high and didn’t leave their doctors high and dry. That’s always good since even an assisted transition is hard.

In other unrelated news, today it was also announced that Amazing Charts was acquired by Pri-Med. This is an interesting acquisition since Amazing Charts has a nice EHR footprint and Pri-Med wasn’t previously in the EHR space. Although, it does seem that Pri-Med’s physician connection could be really beneficial to Amazing Charts. I’m going to try and do an interview with Amazing Charts and Pri-Med which I’ll post on EMR and HIPAA or EMR and EHR.

ImagineMD is part of the EHR consolidation that everyone said is coming. We just can’t sustain 300+ EHR vendors. However, the Amazing Charts acquisition isn’t part of EHR consolidation. It’s similar to the ADP Acquisition of AdvancedMD where Neil Versel aptly pointed out wasn’t the expected EHR consolidation. Add these changes to large EHR vendors shutting down EHR software like MyWay and GE Centricity Advance and were slowly winnowing down the number of EHR vendors out there.

ImagineMD Client Notice:

Dear Clients of Imagine MD:

This notice is to inform you that as of September 30, 2012 (the “Effective Date”), we will no longer be providing Imagine MD Services as defined in the End User License Agreement – Terms of Use as set forth on our website at https://secure.imaginemd.com/Public/docs/terms.pdf (the “Services”). The Services may or may not include, without limitation, electronic prescribing “eRx”, meaningful use attestation services, and other related services. After the Effective Date, you will no longer have access to any of our Services and we will terminate all access codes that we have provided to you.

Following termination of Services we will return to you, or, upon your written instruction, transfer to another party, all patient records, including personal information you have provided to us or we have created and maintained on your behalf. Such information will be provided in an encrypted format. You will be contacted in the near future regarding this transfer of information. The files will include information through the period ending September 30, 2012, or the date as of which you request such data, whichever occurs first. Thirty days after the information is transferred, we will destroy all patient records and we will not retain a copy of the information. Additionally, we will provide you with a log of all relevant disclosures, if any, of protected health information that you may need to fulfill your obligations under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 with regard to the provisions and accounting of such disclosures.

We are terminating all of our services as we are in the process of exiting the business. All of us at Imagine MD thank you for using our services.

If you have any questions, please contact us by email at info@imagine-md.com or call us at (877) 394-7774.

eHealth Made EASY, LLC (a/k/a Imagine MD™)

Full Disclosure: Amazing Charts is an advertiser on this site.