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Don’t Be The Last Practice To “Get” Digital Health

Posted on September 14, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Physicians, are you savvy about the digital health technologies your patients use? Do you make it easy for them to interact with you digitally and share the health data they generate? If not, you need to move ahead and get there already. While you may be satisfied with sidestepping the whole subject, patients aren’t, a recent report suggests.

As you probably know already a growing number of patients, most notably millennials, are integrating digital health tools into their everyday lives.

Research from Rock Health, which surveyed about 4,000 consumers, found that the share of respondents using at least one digital tool (such as telemedicine, digital health tracking apps or wearables) hit 87% last year. To get a sense of how impressive this is, bear in mind that just five years ago, only a tiny handful of consumers had given any of these tools a try.

What’s also of note is that some of these consumers were willing to skip insurance and pay out of pocket for digital care. One particularly clear example of this involves live video telemedicine; Sixty-nine percent of consumers who paid out of pocket for such consults said they were “extremely satisfied” with the experience.

Patients who reported having a chronic health condition seemed less likely to use digital tools to track their health metrics. Case in point: When it came to blood pressure tracking, just 11% captured this data with a digital app or journal. However, this may reflect the higher-than-average of those diagnosed with elevated pressures, a senior population with a lower level of tech sophistication.

Lest all of this sound intimidating, there’s at least some good news here. Apparently, a full 86% of respondents said that they’d be willing to share data with their physician, a much larger share than those who would exchange data with a health plan (58%) or pharmacy (52%). In other words, they trust you, which is a big asset under these circumstances.

If you want to dive into digital health more deeply, here’s a few obvious places to start:

  • Link in-person and telemedicine visits: Rock Health found that a whopping 92% pf respondents who had an in-person visit first were satisfied with their video visit.
  • Be vigilant about data security: Almost 9 out of 10 consumers participating in the survey said that they would be willing to share data with you. Don’t lose that trust to a health data breach; it will be hard if not impossible to get it back.
  • Bring chronically-ill seniors on board: While this group may not be terribly inclined to digitize their healthcare, doing so can help you treat them more effectively, so you’ll probably want to make that point up front.

Like it or not, wearables, fitness bands, mobile health apps, and other digital health tools have arrived. It’s no longer a matter of if you take advantage of them, but when and how. Don’t be the last practice in your neighborhood that just doesn’t get it.

2019 CPT Codes To Cover Remote Monitoring And Digital Care Coordination

Posted on September 10, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

The American Medical Association has released CPT code set changes 2019, and among them are some new options specific to digital health practices.

While providing such codes is a no-brainer — and if anything, the AMA is late to the party – it’s still a bit of noteworthy news, as it could have an impact on the progress of digital care.  After all, the new codes to make it easier to capture the value of some activities providers may be self-funding at present. They can also help physicians track the amount of time they spend on remote monitoring and digital care coordination more easily.

The 2019 release includes 335 changes to the existing code set, such as new and revised codes for adaptive behavior analysis, skin biopsy and central nervous system assessments. The new release also includes five new digital care-related codes.

The 2019 code set includes three new remote patient monitoring codes meant to capture how clinicians connect with patients at home and gather data from care management and coordination, and two new “interprofessional” Internet consult codes for reporting on care coordination discussions between a consulting physician and the treating physician

It’s good to see the AMA follow up with this issue. To date, there have been few effective ways to capture the benefits of interactive care online or even via email exchanges between physician and patient.

As a result, providers have been trapped in a vicious circle in which virtual care doesn’t get documented adequately, payers don’t reimburse because they don’t have the data needed to evaluate its effectiveness and providers don’t keep offering such services because they don’t get paid for performing them.

With the emergence of just five new CPT codes, however, things could begin to change for the better. For example, if physicians are getting paid to consult digitally with their peers on patient care, that gives vendors incentives to support these activities with better technology. This, in turn, can produce better results. Now we’re talking about a virtuous circle instead.

Obviously, it will take a lot more codes to document virtual care processes adequately. The introduction of these five new codes represents a very tentative first step at best. Still, it’s good to see the AMA avoid the chicken-and egg-problem and simply begin to lay the tracks for better-documented digital care. We’ve got to start somewhere.

 

Let Vendors Lead The Way? Are You Nuts?

Posted on August 13, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Every now and then, a vendor pops up and explains how the next-gen EHR should work. It’s easy to ask yourself why anyone should listen, given that you’re the one dishing out the care. But bear with me. I’ve got a theory working here.

First of all, let’s start with a basic assumption, that EHRs aren’t going to stay in their current form much longer. We’re seeing them grow to encompass virtually every form of medical data and just about every transaction, and nobody’s sure where this crazy process is going to end.

Who’s going to be our guide to this world? Vendors. Yup, the people who want to sell you stuff. I will go out on a limb and suggest that at this point in the health data revolution, they’re in a better position to predict the future.

Sure, that probably sounds obnoxious. While vendors may employ reputable, well-intended physicians, the vast majority of those physicians don’t provide care themselves anymore. They’re rusty. And unless they’re in charge of the company they serve, their recommendations may be overruled by people who have never touched a patient.

On the flip side, though, vendor teams have the time and money to explore emerging technologies, not just the hip stuff but the ones that will almost certainly be part of medical practice in the future. The reality is that few practicing physicians have time to keep up with their progress. Heck, I spend all day researching these things, and I’m going nuts trying to figure out which tech has gone from a nifty idea to a practical one.

Given that vendors have the research in hand, it may actually make sense to let them drive the car for a while. Honestly, they’re doing a decent job of riding the waves.

In fact, it seems to me that the current generation of health data management systems are coming closer to where they should be.  For example, far more of what I’d call “enhanced EHR” systems include care management tools, integrating support for virtual visits and modules that help practices pull together MIPS data. As always, they aren’t perfect – for example, few ambulatory EHRs are flexible enough to add new functions easily — but they’re getting better.

I guess what I’m saying is that even if you have no intention of investing in a given product, you might want to see where developers’ ideas are headed. Health data platforms are at an especially fluid stage right now, tossing blockchain, big data analytics, AI and genomic data together and creating new things. Let’s give developers a bit of slack and see what they can do to tame these beasts.

Physicians Are (Justfiably) Ambivalent About Virtual Care

Posted on July 30, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

It’s easy for pundits like myself to support virtual care. From my standpoint, it’s obvious that virtual care is the easiest and most effective way to handle many health conditions, from handling one-off issues like sore throats and sinusitis to managing long-term chronic conditions.

Not only that, emerging devices will allow patients to test their own blood, urine, heart rhythm and more. When these devices are perfected and put into common use, virtual care will become even more useful and appropriate.

Despite all of these signs of progress, though, physicians aren’t all in with virtual care just yet. According to a study by consulting firm Deloitte, doctors think virtual care might help with patient engagement and support. However, doctors said they would need to overcome several obstacles to virtual care use before they get involved.

Generally speaking, survey respondents seem to “get it” about telemedicine. In fact, according to the survey nine in 10 physicians understand the benefits of virtual care, particularly when it came to connecting with patients. They reported that these benefits include improved patient access to care (66%), increased patient satisfaction (52%) and staying connected with patients and their caregivers (45%).

They also said virtual care could improve patient care coordination (42%), boost the cost-effectiveness of care (42%), offer increased flexibility to clinician schedules (41%), streamline workflow (32%) and help them stay connected with peers and other clinicians (28%). Only 11% said they didn’t see any benefits to virtual care.

Given these advantages, you might think that physicians were gung-ho about virtual care adoption – but you’d be wrong. Just over a third (38%) have rolled out email/patient portal consultations, and 17% are conducting physician-to-physician electronic consultations. Only 14% are conducting virtual/video visits.

On a side note, I was interested to learn adoption of such technologies is higher among primary care physicians than specialists. The survey found that 48% of primary care physicians have implemented portals, compared with 34% of specialists, and that 17% of PCPs were offering video visits versus 13% of specialists.

Meanwhile, I was interested to learn that 43% of respondents who had electronic consultation tools at their disposal connected with colleagues at least once a week. In fact, I’m surprised to learn that this is even happening– electronic consults with between doctors and their peers was not on my radar.

But I wasn’t taken aback to learn that physicians employed or affiliated with hospitals and health systems (62%) made regular use of at least one virtual care technology. After all, hospitals are generally ahead of other providers when it comes to telemedicine. (For example, check out Intermountain’s virtual hospital program.)

Bottom line, physicians still face big obstacles to rolling out virtual care, including a need for training (51%), a lack of access to this technology (35%) and worries about security and privacy of patient data (33%).

All told, when I read about their reasonable objections, low physician adoption of virtual care makes a whole lot more sense. Until these concerns are addressed little is likely to change.

Cloud-Based EHRs With Analytics Options Popular With Larger Physician Groups

Posted on April 20, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Ever wonder what large medical practices want from the EHRs these days? According to one study, the answer is “cloud-based systems with all the bells and whistles.”

Black Book Research just completed a six-month client satisfaction poll questioning members of large practices about their EHR preferences. The survey collected data from roughly 19,000 EHR users.

According to the survey, 30% of practices with more than 11 clinicians expect to replace their current EHR by 2021, primarily because they want a more customizable system. It’s not clear whether they are sure yet which vendors offer the best customization options, though it’s likely we’ll hear more about this soon enough.

Among groups planning an EHR replacement, what appealed to them most (with 93% ranking it as their preferred option) was cloud-based mobile solutions offering an array of analytical options. They’re looking for on-demand data and actionable insights into financial performance, compliance tracking and tools to manage contractual quality goals. Other popular features included telehealth/virtual support (87%) and speech recognition solutions for hands-free data entry (82%).

Among those practices that weren’t prepared for an EHR replacement, it seems that some are waiting to see how internal changes within Practice Fusion and eClinicalWorks play out. That’s not surprising given that both vendors boasted an over 93% customer loyalty level for Q1 2018.

The picture for practices with less than six or fewer physicians is considerably different, which shouldn’t surprise anybody given their lack of capital and staff time.  In many cases, these smaller practices haven’t optimized the EHRs they have in place, with many failing to use secure messaging, decision support and electronic data sharing or leverage tools that increase patient engagement.

Large practices and smaller ones do have a few things in common. Ninety-three percent of all sized medical and surgical practices using an installed, functional EHR system are using three basic EHR tools either frequently or always, specifically data repositories, order entry and results review.

On the other hand, few small to midsize groups use advanced features such as electronic messaging, clinical decision support, data sharing, patient engagement tools or interoperability support. Again, this is a world apart from the higher-end IT options the larger practices crave.

For the time being, the smaller practices may be able to hold their own. That being said, other surveys by Black Book suggest that the less-digitalized practices won’t be able to stay that way for long, at least if they want to keep the practice thriving.

A related 2018 Black Book survey of healthcare consumers concluded that 91% of patients under 50 prefer to work with digitally-based practices, especially practices that offer conductivity with other providers and modern portals giving them easy access to the health data via both phones and other devices.

Some Important Tips On Telemedicine Security

Posted on March 22, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Recently, WEDI released a paper offering a pretty basic overview of the main categories of telemedicine services. From my standpoint, most of the paper wasn’t that new and exciting, one section had some interesting suggestions worth sharing. While you’ve probably heard some of them before, you probably haven’t seen the full package they shared.

First, WEDI provided some general principles providers should consider when delivering telehealth services, including that all interactions should be conducted through a secure transmission channel and that privacy notices must be displayed or easy to find on the telehealth site. Makes sense but not earthshattering.

Where things got interesting was when WEDI went through its own telemedicine security Q&A. Its feedback on key topics included the following:

  • Make sure you have a policy addressing provider-to-provider disclosures of HIPAA-protected information which is gathered via telemedicine consult.
  • Secure all telemedicine data. Verify and authenticate user identities and their authority levels before patient treatment, possibly through the log-in process. This could include making sure that there’s a one-to-one match with the person logging in to view the data being retained.
  • Set up standards for data storage and retention, as well as establishing policies, procedures and auditability for access, use and transfer of telemedicine-related PHI. Afterward, monitor compliance with those standards.
  • Decide how telehealth data breaches will be handled, and who will be responsible for doing so. Determine who will be notified when a breach occurs, what the timeline is for doing so and who else might need be notified. Also, identify what experts should be part of a breach response process, such as legal, information security and public affairs representatives, and make sure they know what their roles are if a breach takes place.
  • Bear in mind that any technology used for providing telemedicine services needs to be included in your HIPAA risk assessment.

Unless you work for a large organization, you probably won’t dig into security issues this deeply. Particularly if you work for a smaller practice with ten or fewer clinicians, you may end up outsourcing your entire IT function, including security and privacy protection.

However, it’s important to remember that members of your organization are ultimately responsible for any security violations, whether or not a contractor was involved in permitting the breach to happen.

It’s important that at a minimum, you have a security protection and incident response process in place — going well beyond “call the IT consultant” — that protects both patients and your practice from needless health data breaches. As you add telemedicine to the mix, make sure your process embraces that data too.

Patient Demand For Digital Health Tools May Exceed Providers’ Ability To Deliver

Posted on March 15, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

It’s taken a long time, but it looks like consumers are getting serious about using digital tools to improve their health. According to a new survey by Accenture, in some cases consumers are actually more interested in using such tools than their providers are, researchers found.

Patients are taking advantage of a wide range of digital health options, including mobile tech (46%), accessing electronic health records (38%), social media (35%), wearable technology (33%), smart scales (27%), remote consultations (16%) and remote monitoring (14%). All of these numbers are up from 2017, notably mobile and access to electronic health records, use of which grew 10% and 9% respectively.

The survey also notes that the number of consumers receiving virtual healthcare services has increased since last year, from 21% in 2017 to 25% this year. Seventy-four percent of those accessing virtual care were satisfied with the encounter. Meanwhile, about three-quarters of consumers said they would use virtual care for after-hours appointments, and about two-thirds would choose this option for follow-up appointments after seeing a doctor in person.

Key takeaways for clinicians, meanwhile, include that while patients agree that in-person visits provide quality care, engage patients in their health care decisions and diagnose problems faster, virtual visits offer some significant advantages too. Virtual care benefits they identified include reducing medical costs to patients, accommodating patient schedules and providing timely care, respondents said.

Clinicians should also note that AI-based virtual doctors may someday become the competition. When asked whether they would use an AI virtual doctor provided by their provider, some were doubtful, with 29% saying they prefer visiting the doctor, 26% that they didn’t understand enough about how AI works, and 23% that they did not want to share their data.

However, 47% said they would choose a virtual doctor because it would be available whenever they needed it. Also, 36% said they’d use a virtual doctor because it would save time by avoiding a trip to the doctor, and 24% said they’d like to access a virtual doctor because the AI would have access to large amounts of relevant information.

Right now, it’s far more likely that hospitals will have the capacity to deliver such services, which may demand a higher level of IT expertise and staff time that many medical practices have available. Nonetheless, it seems likely that at some point, medical practices will need to offer more digital services if they want to remain competitive.

Physicians, Patients Intrigued By Digital Health Options

Posted on March 12, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

While digital health technologies have been available for many years, it’s taken a long time to get both doctors and patients comfortable with using them. However, the time is fast approaching, as the following study suggests.

New research from Ernst & Young has concluded that both physicians and consumers want to collaborate using digital technologies. The study found that consumers are comfortable reaching out to the doctors via digital channels and that physicians agree that digital technologies and data sharing can improve patient well-being.

More than half (54%) of consumers responding to the survey said they were comfortable contacting their doctor digitally. Also, they were interested in using technologies found outside of the physician’s office, including at-home diagnostic testing (36%), using a smartphone or connected device to share information (33%) and video consultations (21%).

Meanwhile, 83% of physicians told researchers that harvesting consumer and patient-generated data would make more personalized care plans possible and improve care quality. In addition, 66% said they felt increased use of digital technologies would make the healthcare system more efficient and lower costs, while 64% said it would help lower the burden on doctors and nurses, reducing the potential for burnout.

To make such cooperation practical, however, providers need to create incentives for data sharing, the E&Y researchers concluded.

When asked whether they were prepared to share lifestyle information with their physician, only 26% said yes. On the other hand, if doing so would allow them to reduce waiting times, 61% said they would share such data, if it would lower costs, 55% were interested. Also of note, 26% said they would be willing to share dietary and exercise information if they got tailored diet and exercise plans.

That being said, the level of interest in digital cooperation varied by demographics. Specifically, the survey found much lower levels of engagement and interest from consumers age 45 years and older, regardless of the form of technology discussed.

Still, both consumers and physicians seem to have a fair amount of optimism about the future of health. Sixty-four percent of consumers reported that they saw the US health industry as innovative, and 70% of physicians saw currently used technology as effective, both of which are high-water marks.

As this research points out, the gap between physician users of medical data and consumer portal users is narrowing by the day, but it’s still far from closed. It may take some time to figure out what incentives consumers find the most motivating. At the moment, it’s still a shot in the dark.

Does HIMSS Serve Practicing Doctors Well?

Posted on March 5, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Take a look around you at HIMSS18 and you will see a lot of different types. Of course, the biggest and flashiest presence will be the hordes of vendor marketing and salespeople. You’ll also run into C-suite and mid-level executives with health systems in hospitals or managing partners of large medical practices, along with a grab bag of consultants, researchers, attorneys and bloggers like myself.

What you seldom see, however — and this has been true for decades — are physicians active in day-to-day medical practice. I’m sure the reasons for this vary, including a reluctance to spend the time and money to attend and questions about the show’s immediate value, but regardless, practicing doctors are sorely underrepresented at the annual HIT blast.

In the past, I might’ve suggested that the reason they aren’t showing up was lack of interest. After all, in the past, most physicians had very little contact with their IT infrastructure. Sure, they interacted with billing and coding systems, and to a lesser extent practice management platforms, but that was about it.

That’s hardly the case today, though. For most doctors, it’s smartphones in the morning, tablets in the afternoon and EMRs all day. What’s more, some practices are integrating connected health monitoring and wearables data to the mix and some are rolling out telemedicine services.  While few doctors have to dig into the guts of these tools, they’re increasingly dependent upon them and in some cases, and hardly function without daily access.

Given the extent to which these tools are ultimately designed to serve clinicians at the point of care, it’s disconcerting how seldom HIMSS attendees seem to put clinicians’ IT challenges front and center.

Perhaps I’m being unfair, but my sense is that most of the show is designed to serve health systems CIOs, practice leaders with complex IT needs and to a lesser extent, the influencers that guide sales decisions (such as analyst firms). I’m not saying small-practice doctors get ignored, but from what I’ve seen they don’t get catered to either. In fact, many companies focused on small practices have stopped exhibiting at HIMSS because of this and instead focus on the various medical society conferences.

Sadly, this reflects the larger dynamic in which vendors work to strike deals with senior executives first, putting physician needs largely aside. Rather than seeing to it that the actual end users find the products to be workable, they accept the reality that most cases, non-physicians are calling the shots.

For the benefit of the entire health IT community, I hope that in successive years, HIMSS does far more to attract the 10-doctor and below practices that make up the backbone of the medical community. Letting the deepest pockets in health IT systems dictate everything is simply toxic.

Medical Groups Adopting Telehealth, But Cautiously

Posted on February 5, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Telehealth has gone from a neat idea to an accepted part of the spectrum of care. However, it’s largely been hospitals, not doctors, which have dived into telemedicine wholeheartedly

Recent data suggests that while doctors are gradually adopting telecare, they have many reservations about doing so. A study published last year by Reaction Data found that while 68% of physicians said they were in favor of telemedicine, most were using it only in special situations such as reaching patients in rural areas, visit follow-ups and managing specific patient populations.

A new survey by the Medical Group Management Association has reached a similar conclusion. In a poll conducted last month by the trade group, the MGMA found medical practices’ approaches to telemedicine have changed only marginally since January of last year.

In this year’s Stat poll, which had 1,292 respondents, 26% of respondents said their organization offered telehealth services, and another 15% said they planned to offer them in the future. That’s up only 3% from January 2017 research, which found that 23% of respondents provided such services and 18% planned to add them.

Meanwhile, two key statistics have stayed in place from last year. Thirty-nine percent of respondents to this year’s survey said they didn’t offer telehealth services and 20% weren’t sure if they would, the same percentages found in last year’s research.

When it announced the results, MGMA shared some specific suggestions for planning and implementing a telehealth program. They include:

  • Researching and understanding patient needs
  • Setting clear goals for telehealth and tying them to an existing strategic plan, which demands fewer organizational changes and speeds adoption
  • Understanding how telehealth supports value-based care
  • Researching telehealth vendors and platforms
  • Researching reimbursement and licensure requirements (if any) in the practice environment
  • Engaging and educating practice staff members on telehealth issues and strategies
  • Having doctors reach out to colleagues in their specialty to learn how their telehealth implementation experience has gone
  • Bearing in mind that telehealth implementations typically take an average of one year from plan to rollout

All that being said, it seems likely that some of the practices which are hanging back from telehealth have taken most or even all of the steps outlined above. The thing is, even if a practice has researched the telemedicine market, understands its patients’ needs and knows what issues it will face during a service rollout, these steps still can’t address some of the fundamental realities holding telehealth back today.

The truth is, from what I’ve seen medical practices still face two difficult issues when they consider telehealth seriously: how to make money at it and how to fit it into their workflow. These are major problems and won’t be resolved by advice alone (not that this is MGMA’s fault of course).

Despite medical groups’ concerns, there will doubtless be a tipping point where practices begin to see telehealth services as a routine part of what they provide. However, it seems clear that we’re far from getting there.