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ICD-10 Frequently Asked Questions (Including Update on Revised CMS-1500 Form)

Posted on March 24, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The following is a guest blog post by Dana Deardorff.

Are you concerned about the upcoming changes in coding? The following are answers to frequently asked questions that will help you prepare for the changes ahead. Please note the deadline for the first significant change is April 1, 2014.

What does ICD-10 stand for?

ICD-10 is an abbreviation. It stands for the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision. It is used when referring to either the Clinical Modification (ICD-10-CM) or Procedure Coding System (ICD-10-PCS).

How will ICD-10-CM be used?

ICD-10-CM will replace ICD-9-CM codes, Volumes 1 and 2. It will be used when reporting clinical setting diagnoses.

How will ICD-10-PCS be used?

ICD-10-PCS will be used by hospitals to report inpatient procedures.

Who has to convert to ICD-10?

Health care providers, clearinghouses, payers and physicians all are required to convert to ICD-10. This is not optional and includes any HIPAA covered entity.

What will happen if I don’t convert to ICD-10 by the October 1st deadline?

If you submit ICD-9 codes after October 1, 2014, those transactions will not be accepted. Those transactions will be denied. This will cause you to lose out on reimbursements. You may need to apply for a line of credit to prepare for cash flow disruptions that may occur due to noncompliance problems. This will help protect you from negative impact if your medical practice partners do not convert to ICD-10 in time.

What is the deadline for the ICD-10 conversion?

The deadline is October 1, 2014.

What is this April 1, 2014 deadline I keep hearing about?

The April 1 deadline is for the revised CMS-1500 form used for submission of paper claims. The CMS-1500 form is an intricate part of the ICD coding system. The new form (version 02/12) is replacing version 08/05. As of April 1, 2014 providers need to use version 02/12 of the CMS-1500 form. The old form will no longer be accepted.

How is the revised CMS-1500 form tied into the ICD-10 transition?

Physicians will notice that the revised CMS-1500 form provides fields for the new ICD-10 codes. However, your payors may not have made the transition from ICD-9 to ICD-10. Physicians should use ICD-9 codes until you have confirmed that the payor has made the transition to ICD-10. After October 1, 2014, your payors should have all made the transition to ICD-10, and you should be able to use the new codes from that date forward.

What is different about the revised CMS-1500 form?

The revised CMS-1500 form:

* Provides fields and indicators for both ICD-9 and ICD-10 codes

* Provides documentation space for up to 12 diagnosis codes

* Offers qualifiers to aid in the identification of provider roles in the furnishing of services

* Uses letters instead of numbers as diagnosis code printers

You will want to upgrade your practice management software or order 02/12 forms immediately if you have not done so already. Discard any 08/05 forms after April 1, 2014.

When should physicians start using the revised CMS-1500 form?

Providers can start using the revised form on January 1, 2014, but all providers must switch to using the revised form as of April 1, 2014. Your (PM) Practice Management/EMR/EHR practice vendor can help you determine what you need to do to remain in compliance as you transition to ICD-10.

About Dana Deardorff of MediPro
MediPro is a full-service medical billing software company offering practice management (PM) software, electronic health records (EHR) and electronic medical records (EMR) from McKesson and IMS.

Since 1995, MediPro, Inc. has been a nationally recognized, award-winning medical billing software company offering practice management systems and electronic health record solutions. MediPro’s mission is to deliver and support integrated solutions to the healthcare community. MediPro recognizes the need for a comprehensive, interactive and cost-effective suite of applications that are customized to address the specific needs of healthcare offices.

5010 Enforcement Delayed by CMS

Posted on March 15, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The Twitterverse is alive with people tweeting about the news that Modern Healthcare broke about CMS deciding to delay enforcement of 5010 until June 2012. Here’s a quote from the article:

The CMS will not begin enforcing the mandated move to Version 5010 transaction standards for an additional three months, until after June 30.

In some ways this is just delaying the inevitable and giving payers a reason to delay their 5010 implementation even more. However, there were likely so many practices that wouldn’t get paid under 5010 and many payers who would be paying using the non-compliant 4010 that this was probably a smart move to delay. For those not that familiar with some of the issues, here’s a good post about how practices should deal with the move from 4010 to 5010. The post highlights the challenge to a practice when some payers are on 5010 and others aren’t yet ready for it.

I’d been hearing a lot of rumblings about the challenges of 5010, so this isn’t that big of a surprise. Although, you can be sure that CMS didn’t want to delay 5010. Particularly since CMS had recently delayed ICD-10 implementation as well. Although, I think fewer people will complain about this 5010 delay compared with those still arguing against the ICD-10 delay.

101 Tips to Make Your EMR and EHR More Useful – EHR Tips 41-45

Posted on September 20, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Time for the next entry covering Shawn Riley’s list of 101 Tips to Make your EMR and EHR More Useful. I hope you’re enjoying the series.

45. Think about ICD-10 compliance sooner than later
ICD-10 goes into effect October 1, 2013. (barring them postponing it again). Can you imagine if you’ve implemented an EHR and then find out that the EHR isn’t ready to support ICD-10? Sure, we’re still a little ways out, but ICD-10 has been on the docket for a long time coming.

44. Make sure your revenue cycle process is as clean as possible
Cleaner processes are easier to implement. Your revenue is going to take a hit when you first implement an EHR in your office just based on the learning curve of EHR. You don’t want to add to the changes by having to change any issues with revenue cycle at the same time.

43. Don’t underestimate the time necessary to be compliant with 5010
This won’t be as bad as ICD-10 for most practices, but you want to be ready for it.

42. Keep transcription in mind
Make sure you have a good understanding of the costs associated with cutting out transcription. Notice that I said costs and not savings. I already know that you’re aware of the savings of cutting transcription. What you might not have taken into account is the costs of ending transcription. If you’re doing voice recognition then you’re going to need the software, a great microphone, and possibly faster/newer computers. If you’re doing voice recognition there will be more manual corrections that you’ll have to do than in transcription. If you’re cutting out all voice input of data, then just be aware that you may hate “all the clicks” and want to go back to transcription in some form. Is your EMR conducive with that change if you decide to go back to transcription?

41. Watch your insurance claim denials
Of course, most clinics are doing this already. However, a whole new set of claim denials will happen because of how your EMR files those claims. You don’t want to miss out on the insurance money because you can’t handle the claim denials in a timely manner.

If you want to see my analysis of the other 101 EMR and EHR tips, I’ll be updating this page with my 101 EMR and EHR tips analysis. So, click on that link to see the other EMR tips.