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AMA Promotes Common Model For Health Data Organization

Posted on October 24, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

What do we really need to make the best use of shared patient data?  Some say that once we have adequate data sharing protocols in place (such as FHIR or Direct), organizing and using the data will be well within our capabilities. Other efforts assume that if we pulled together the right common data set, deciding how to exchange the data physically won’t be as big of an issue as it has been.

A new initiative from the American Medical Association seems to fall into the latter category The AMA has announced that it’s created a common data model which it says is missing in healthcare. The Integrated Health Model Initiative (IHMI), which has attracted the support of heavy hitters like IBM and Cerner, is a “shared framework for organizing health data, emphasizing patient-centric information, and refining data elements to those most predictive of achieving better outcomes,” according to an AMA statement.

The AMA and its partners said that the new model will include clinically-validated data elements which it says can speed up the development of improved data organization, management and analytics. Its initial focus will be on costly chronic diseases such as hypertension, diabetes and asthma.

The effort will include technical development efforts which will address interoperability problems, cumbersome or inadequate data structures and poor interface designs which forced physicians to click far too often, the trade group said.

From my standpoint, there’s a lot that’s hazy about this announcement, which was long on form but pretty short on substance.

For one thing, it’s not clear what Cerner, in particular, is getting out of this effort. It’s already an anchor member of the CommonWell Health Alliance which, having merged with rival group Carequality, arguably offers as mature an interoperability model as any out there today. Also, while even a giant like IBM needs continued press attention, I’m not sure how much benefit it will realize here.

Not only that, it’s hard to tell where the AMA and partners will take IHMI. The trade group has posted a set of data model specifications to its site. The group has also created a process wherein physicians review data elements and missions and decide whether they meet clinical applicability and consistency requirements. In addition, it’s creating technical and clinical communities focused on key sub-areas of interest. But it’s still not clear what all of this means and why it’s important.

Ultimately, the initial press release is as much a buzzword cloud as it is a statement of intent. Pardon my cynicism, but I doubt even a group with the AMA’s clout can fix interoperability problems, streamline data structures and foster more elegant UI design in health IT in one fell swoop.

The announcement does do something useful regardless, however. While I’m not personally qualified to say whether it will take universally accepted standards for data exchange, a widely-used reference set for health data or both, I believe someone should address these questions. As proposed interoperability solutions pop up on both sides, perhaps we’ll get some answers.

 

Say It One More Time: EHRs Are Hard To Use

Posted on September 19, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

I don’t know about you, but I was totes surprised to hear about another study pointing out that doctors have good reasons to hate their EHR. OK, not really surprised – just a bit sadder on their account – but I admit I’m awed that any single software system can be (often deservedly) hated this much and in this many ways.

This time around, the parties calling out EHR flaws were the American Medical Association and the University of Wisconsin, which just published a paper in the Annals of Family Medicine looking at how primary care physicians use their EHR.

To conduct their study, researchers focused on how 142 family physicians in southeastern Wisconsin used their Epic system. The team dug into Epic event logging records covering a three-year period, sorting out whether the activities in question involved direct patient care or administrative functions.

When they analyzed the data, the researchers found that clinicians spent 5.9 hours of an 11.4-hour workday interacting with the EHR. Clerical and administrative tasks such as documentation, order entry, billing and coding and system security accounted about 44% of EHR time and inbox management roughly another 24% percent.

As the U of W article authors see it, this analysis can help practices make better use of clinicians’ time. “EHR event logs can identify areas of EHR-related work that could be delegated,” they conclude, “thus reducing workload, improving professional satisfaction, and decreasing burnout.”

The AMA, for its part, was not as detached. In a related press release, the trade group argued that the long hours clinicians spend interacting with EHRs are due to poor system design. Honestly, I think it’s a bit of a stretch to connect the study results directly to this conclusion, but of course, the group isn’t wrong about the low levels of usability most EHRs foist on doctors.

To address EHR design flaws, the AMA says, there are eight priorities vendors should consider, including that the systems should:

  • Enhance physicians’ ability to provide high-quality care
  • Support team-based care
  • Promote care coordination
  • Offer modular, configurable products
  • Reduce cognitive workload
  • Promote data liquidity
  • Facilitate digital and mobile patient engagement
  • Integrate user input into EHR product design and post-implementation feedback

I’m not sure all of these points are as helpful as they could be. For example, there are approximately a zillion ways in which an EHR could enhance the ability to provide high-quality care, so without details, it’s a bit of a wash. I’d say the same thing about the digital/mobile patient engagement goal.

On the other hand, I like the idea of reducing cognitive workload (which, in cognitive psychology, refers to the total amount of mental effort being used in working memory). There’s certainly evidence, both within and outside medicine, which underscores the problems that can occur if professionals have too much to process. I’m confident vendors can afford design experts who can address this issue directly.

Ultimately, though, it’s not important that the AMA churns out a perfect list of usability testing criteria. In fact, they shouldn’t have to be telling vendors what they need at this point. It’s a shame EHR vendors still haven’t gotten the usability job done.

Retail Clinics Are Not the Enemy, Inconvenience Is!

Posted on June 16, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Check out this incredible insight that Gabriel Perna shared on Twitter:

What a great insight and something that most of the entrenched healthcare people don’t understand. Retail clinics are not the enemy, inconvenience is.

In many ways, it reminds me of the approach that taxi cabs took to Uber and Lyft. Taxis described them as evil as opposed to understanding why consumers wanted to use Uber and Lyft instead of a taxi cab. If the taxi cab industry would have understood the conveniences that Uber and Lyft provided customers, they could have replicated it and made Uber and Lyft disappear (or at least they could have battled them more effective than they’ve done to date).

Gabriel Perna further describes the issues of retail clinics and AMA’s approach to retail clinics in his article and this excerpt:

There are many reasons for this phenomenon [growth of retail clinics], but more than anything though, retail clinics are convenient and many physician offices are not. Because of this, the AMA shouldn’t be trying to treat the retail clinics as some kind of foreign invader, but rather use their rise to prominence as a way to guide physician practices forward. For instance, getting in to see a doctor shouldn’t be a three-week endeavor, especially when the patient is sick and needs attention immediately. However, that’s what has happened. Personally, I’ve been told “the doctor doesn’t have anything open for at least a month” more times than I can count.

It’s simple supply and demand. If you or your child needs to see someone immediately because of an illness and your doctor’s office can’t take in you for a week, and there happens to be a retail clinic down the street, guess where you’re going? Any hesitations you may have over your care being fragmented, the limited ability of your retail clinic physician, or anything else will go out the window pretty quickly.

I agree completely with the idea that convenience is key. However, what Gabriel doesn’t point out is that the fact that doctors have a 3 week waiting list for patients is why they don’t care about offering convenience to their patients. They have enough patients and so they don’t see why they should change.

You can imagine the taxi cab industry was in a similar position. They had plenty of people using their taxi service. They didn’t see how this new entrant could cause them trouble because they were unsafe and whatever other reasons they rationalized why the new entrant wouldn’t be accepted by the masses. Are we seeing the same thing with retail clinics vs traditional healthcare? I think so. Will it eventually catch up to them? I think so.

What’s even more interesting in healthcare is that retail clinics are just one thing that’s attacking the status quo. Telemedicine is as well. Home health apps and sensors are. AI is. etc etc etc. All of these have the potential to really disrupt the way we consume healthcare.

The question remains: Will traditional healthcare system be disrupted or will they embrace these changes and make them new tools in how they offer care? It took the taxi cab industry years to adapt and build an app that worked like Uber and Lyft. However, it was too late for them. I don’t think it’s too late for healthcare, but it’s getting close.

Healthcare Trade Groups Join To Evaluate mHealth Apps

Posted on December 29, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

A group of leading healthcare organizations, including HIMSS, the American Medical Association, the American Heart Association and DHX Group, have come together to evaluate mHealth apps. The new organization, which calls itself Xcertia, says members came together to foster knowledge about clinical content, usability, privacy, security and evidence of efficacy for such apps.

It’s hardly surprising that that healthcare groups would want to take a stand on the issue of health app quality. According to a study published late last year by the IMS Institute for Healthcare Informatics, there are at least 165,000 mHealth apps available on the iTunes and Android stores.

But what percentage of those apps are worth using? Nobody really knows. It’s hard to tell after casual use which apps are useful and which don’t live up to their hype, which protect patient privacy and which leave data open to prying eyes, and particularly, which offer some form of clinical benefit and which just waste people’s time. And without a set of formal standards by which to judge, it’s very hard to compare one with the other in a meaningful way.

This uncertainty is holding back mHealth adoption by doctors. According to a recent survey by the AMA, physicians are interested in using apps and related tools – in fact, 85% told researches that digital health solutions can have a positive impact on patient care – they’re also reluctant to “prescribe” apps until they understand them better. (There’s also a group of doctors I’ve encountered who say that until mobile apps are FDA-approved, they won’t take them seriously, but that may be another story.)

In late November, attendees at a recent AMA meeting moved the mHealth puck up the ice a little bit, adopting a set of proposed set best principles for mobile health design. The criteria they adopted for mobile apps and devices included that they should follow evidence-based practice guidelines, support data portability and interoperability, and have a clinical evidence base to support their use. But these guidelines are hardly specific enough to help doctors decide which apps to adopt.

So far, all Xcertia is willing to say about its plans is that it plans to develop a framework of principles that will “positively impact the trajectory of the mobile health app industry.” The guidelines should help both consumers and clinicians choose mHealth apps, the group reports.

Let’s hope those guidelines are less ho-hum than those coming out of the AMA meeting – after all, it certainly would be good if developers and providers had concrete standards upon which they could base their app efforts.

Rival Interoperability Groups Connect To Share Health Data

Posted on December 27, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Two formerly competitive health data interoperability groups have agreed to work together to share data with each others’ members. CommonWell Health Alliance, which made waves when it included Cerner but not Epic in its membership, has agreed to share data with Carequality, of which Epic is a part. (Of course, Epic said that it chose not to participate in the former group, but let’s not get off track with inside baseball here!)

Anyway, CommonWell was founded in early 2013 by a group of six health IT vendors (Cerner, McKesson, Allscripts, athenahealth, Greenway Medical Technologies and RelayHealth.) Carequality, for its part, launched in January of this year, with Epic, eClinicalWorks, NextGen Healthcare and Surescripts on board.

Under the terms of the deal, the two will shake hands and play nicely together. The effort will seemingly be assisted by The Sequoia Project, the nonprofit parent under which Carequality operates.

The Sequoia Project brings plenty of experience to the table, as it operates eHealth Exchange, a national health information network. Its members include the AMA, Kaiser Permanente, CVS’s Minute Clinic, Walgreens and Surescripts, while CommonWell is largely vendor-focused.

As things stand, CommonWell runs a health data sharing network allowing for cross-vendor nationwide data exchange. Its services include patient ID management, record location and query/retrieve broker services which enable providers to locate multiple records for patient using a single query.

Carequality, for its part, offers a framework which supports interoperability between health data sharing network and service providers. Its members include payer networks, vendor networks, ACOs, personal health record and consumer services.

Going forward, CommonWell will allow its subscribers to share health information through directed queries with any Carequality participant.  Meanwhile, Carequality will create a version of the CommonWell record locator service and make it available to any of its providers.

Once the record-sharing agreement is fully implemented, it should have wide ranging effects. According to The Sequoia Project, CommonWell and Carequality participants cut across more than 90% of the acute EHR market, and nearly 60% of the ambulatory EHR market. Over 15,000 hospitals clinics and other healthcare providers are actively using the Carequality framework or CommonWell network.

But as with any interoperability project, the devil will be in the details. While cross-group cooperation sounds good, my guess is that it will take quite a while for both groups to roll out production versions of their new data sharing technologies.

It’s hard for me to imagine any scenario in which the two won’t engage in some internecine sniping over how to get this done. After all, people have a psychological investment in their chosen interoperability approach – so I’d be astonished if the two teams don’t have, let’s say, heated discussions over how to resolve their technical differences. After all, it’s human factors like these which always seem to slow other worthy efforts.

Still, on the whole I’d say that if it works, this deal is good for health IT. More cooperation is definitely better than less.

AMA Approves List Of Best Principles For Mobile Health App Design

Posted on November 29, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

The American Medical Association has effectively thrown her weight behind the use of mobile health applications, at least if those apps meet the criteria members agreed on at a recent AMA meeting. That being said, the group also argues that the industry needs to expand the evidence base demonstrating that apps are accurate, effective, safe and secure. The principles, which were approved at its recent Interim Meeting, are intended to guide coverage and payment policies supporting the use of mHealth apps.

The AMA attendees agreed on the following principles, which are intended to guide the use of not only mobile health apps but also associated devices, trackers and sensors by patients, physicians and others. They require that mobile apps and devices meet the following somewhat predictable criteria:

  • Supporting the establishment or continuation of a valid patient-physician relationship
  • Having a clinical evidence base to support their use in order to ensure mHealth apps safety and effectiveness
  • Following evidence-based practice guidelines, to the degree they are available, to ensure patient safety, quality of care and positive health outcomes
  • Supporting data portability and interoperability in order to promote care coordination through medical home and accountable care models
  • Abiding by state licensure laws and state medical practice laws and requirements in the state in which the patient receives services facilitated by the app
  • Requiring that physicians and other health practitioners delivering services through the app be licensed in the state where the patient receives services, or will be providing these services is otherwise authorized by that state’s medical board
  • Ensuring that the delivery of any service via the app is consistent with the state scope of practice laws

In addition to laying out these principles, the AMA also looked at legal issues physicians might face in using mHealth apps. And that’s where things got interesting.

For one thing, the AMA argues that it’s at least partially on a physician’s head to school patients on how secure and private a given app may be (or fail to be). That implies that your average physician will probably have to become more aware of how well a range of apps handle such issues, something I doubt most have studied to date.

The AMA also charges physicians to become aware of whether mHealth apps and associated devices, trackers and sensors are abiding by all applicable privacy and security laws. In fact, according to the new policy, doctors are supposed to consult with an attorney if they don’t know whether mobile health apps meet federal or state privacy and security laws. That warning, while doubtless prudent, must not be helping members sleep at night.

Finally, the AMA notes that there are still questions remaining as to what risks physicians face who use, recommend or prescribe mobile apps. I have little doubt that they are right about this.

Just think of the malpractice lawsuit possibilities. Is the doctor liable because they relied on inaccurate app results collected by the patient? If the app they recommended presented inaccurate results? How about if the app was created by the practice or health system for which they work? What about if the physician relied on inaccurate data generated by a sensor or wearable — is a physician liable or the device manufacturer? If I can come up with these questions, you know a plaintiff’s attorney can do a lot better.

AMA Urges Med Schools To Cover Health IT Basics

Posted on November 17, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Despite the nearly universal use of health IT tools in medical practice today, the majority of med students make it through their medical school experience without having much exposure to such tools. In an effort to change this, the AMA is launching a new textbook designed to give med students at least a basic exposure to critical health IT topics.

To create the textbook, the AMA collaborated with its 32-school Accelerating Change in Medical Education Consortium. The collaboration generated a new “pillar” of medical education it dubs Health Systems Science, which members concluded should be taught alongside of basic and clinical sciences. This follows a recent study by the AMA concluding that its practicing physician members are quite interested in digital health.

In addition to covering key business concepts such as value in healthcare, patient safety, quality improvement, teamwork/team science and leadership, socio-ecological determinants of health, healthcare policy and health care economics, the textbook also addresses clinical informatics and population health.  And an AMA press release notes that many schools within the Consortium will soon use the textbook with the students, including Penn State College of Medicine and Brown University’s Warren Alpert Medical School.

The Brown program, for example, which received a $1 million AMA grant to support the change in this curriculum, has created a Primary Care-Population Medicine program. The program awards graduates both a Doctor of Medicine and a Master of Science in Population Medicine. The AMA describes this program is the first of its kind in the US.

It’s interesting to see that the AMA has stepped in and funded this project, partly because it seems to have been ambivalent about key health IT tools in the past, but partly because I expect to see vendors doing something like this. Honestly, now that I think about it, I’m surprised there isn’t a Cerner grant for the most promising clinical informatics grad, say, or the eClinicalWorks prize sponsoring a student’s medical training. Maybe the schools have rules against such things.

Actually, this is a rare situation in which I think getting vendors involved might be a good idea. Of course, med students wouldn’t benefit particularly from being trained exclusively on one vendor’s interface, but I imagine schools could organize regular events in which med school students had a chance to learn about different vendors’ platforms and judge the strengths and weaknesses of each on their own.

I guess what I’m saying is that while obtaining an academic understanding of health IT tools is great, the next step is to have med students get their hands on a wide variety of health IT tools and play with them before they’re on the front lines. That being said, adding pop health any clinical informatics is a step in the right direction

Should More Doctors Think About MACRA Like Med School? – MACRA Monday

Posted on November 7, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is part of the MACRA Monday series of blog posts where we dive into the details of the MACRA Quality Payment Program.

While at the recent MGMA Annual conference I ran into Dr. Robert Wah at the CSC Health booth. Dr. Wah has a fascinating background as the former President of the AMA and was also the first Deputy National Coordinator for Health IT back in the Brailer days before now becoming Global Chief Medical Officer at CSC. No doubt he’s seen the full evolution of healthcare IT.

During our chat, Dr. Wah expressed some concern about doctors decision to not properly prepare for MACRA. Between the Pick Your Pace options which basically mean doctors don’t have to fully participate in 2017 and the MACRA final rule being published with a comment period, many doctors have decided to just sit back and not worry about MACRA for now. Those doctors argue that they should wait until the comment period is over to see if the final rule will be changed or they just figure they’ll worry about MACRA in 2018 when they have to fully participate.

Dr. Wah explained to me that this is a dangerous strategy for doctors to employ. He then compared this strategy to medical school. Dr. Wah said that medical students realize pretty early on that they can’t just cram for a class the day before the test in medical school. If students get behind in their studies, then it’s really hard for them to catch up before the test.

Dr. Wah argues that this is what many doctors are doing with MACRA and it could lead to problems. Much like in medical school, it won’t be possible to “cram” for MACRA right before a doctor must fully participate in 2018. Instead, doctors need to use 2017 to appropriately “study” for the MACRA test that’s coming in 2018.

Thanks to Pick Your Pace, CMS have given doctors a pretty big window to make sure that they’re ready for everything that’s required with the full MACRA requirements in 2018. Those that sit on their hands in 2017 will be complaining about how hard MACRA is in 2018. Those that fully participate in 2017 will likely not worry much about the MACRA requirements in 2018.

Be sure to check out all of our MACRA Monday blog posts where we dive into the details of the MACRA Quality Payment Program.

AMA Touts Physician Interest In Digital Health Tools

Posted on October 13, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

A few months ago, the group’s annual meeting, American Medical Association head Dr. James Madara ignited a firestorm of controversy when he suggested that many direct to consumer digital health products, apps and even EMRs were “the digital snake oil of the early 21st century.” Madara, who as far as I can tell never backed down completely from that statement, certainly raised a few hackles with his pronouncement.

Now, the AMA has come out with the results of physician survey whose results suggest that community doctors may be more excited about digital health’s potential than the AMA leader. The survey found that physicians are optimistic about digital health, though some issues must be addressed before they will be ready to adopt such technologies.

The study, which was backed by the AMA and conducted by research firm Kantar TNS, surveyed 1,300 physicians between July 7 and 18. Its content addressed a wide range of digital health technologies, including mobile apps, remote monitoring, wearables, mobile health and telemedicine.

Key findings of the study include the following:

  • While physicians across all age groups, practice settings and tenures were optimistic about the potential for digital health, their level of enthusiasm was greater than their current adoption rates.
  • The majority of physicians surveyed (85% of respondents) believe that digital health solutions can have a positive impact on patient care.
  • Physicians reported that they were optimistic a digital health can reduce burnout, while improving practice efficiency, patient safety and diagnostic capabilities.
  • Physicians said liability coverage, data privacy and integration of digital health tools with EMR workflows were critical to digital health adoption, as well as the availability of easy-to-use technologies which are proven to be effective and reimbursement for time spent conducting virtual visits.

All told, physicians seem willing to use digital health tools if they fit into their clinical practice. And now, it seems that the AMA wants to get out ahead of this wave, as long as the tools meet their demands. “The AMA is dedicated to shaping a future when digital health tools are evidence based, validated, interoperable, and actionable,” said AMA Immediate Past President Steven J. Stack, M.D

By the way, though it hasn’t publicized them highly, the AMA noted that it has already dipped its oar into several digital health-related ventures:

  • It serves as founding partner to Health2047, a San Francisco-based health care innovation company that combines strategy, design and venture disciplines.
  • It’s involved in a partnership with Chicago-based incubator MATTER, to allow entrepreneurs and physicians to collaborate on the development of new technologies, services and products in a simulated health care environment.
  • It’s collaborating with IDEA Labs, a student-run biotechnology incubator, that helps to support the next generation of young entrepreneurs to tackle unmet needs in healthcare delivery and clinical medicine.
  • It’s playing an advisory role to the SMART project, whose key mission is the development of a flexible information infrastructure that allows for free, open development of plug-and-play apps to increase interoperability among health care technologies, including EHRs, in a more cost-effective way.
  • It’s involved in a partnership with Omada Health and Intermountain Healthcare that has introduced evidence-based, technology-enabled care models addressing prediabetes.

Personally, I have little doubt that this survey is a direct response to the “snake oil” speech. But regardless of why the AMA is seeking a rapproachment with digital health players, it’s a good thing. I’m just happy to see the venerable physicians’ group come down on the side of progress.

 

AMA Introduces MACRA Tools – MACRA Monday

Posted on October 10, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

This post is part of the MACRA Monday series of blog posts where we dive into the details of the MACRA Quality Payment Program.

The American Medical Association has released a package of online tools designed to help physicians cope with major changes to Medicare rolling out next year under MACRA. While it’s likely that practices will still have plenty of challenges to address on their own, these tools seem like they may offer a leg up on the subject, particularly for smaller practices with less resources to throw at MACRA issues.

One of the tools being introduced is the AMA Payment Model Evaluator (Sadly an account is required, but there’s an option to create a new account), designed to help doctors determine how their practices will be impacted by MACRA. The Evaluator, which was developed in partnership with physicians and AMA partners, asks physicians and medical practice administrators to fill out an online questionnaire on their practice. The Evaluator then offers an assessment of their specific situation, along with educational material and other resources. This includes recommendations on which MACRA payment model is best for them, which can help your practice know the best direction for your specific needs.

The AMA has also added new MACRA-specific tools to its AMA Steps Forward collection of practice improvement strategies. The STEPS modules help physicians determine how to report on quality metrics central to MACRA as well as the Physician Quality Reporting System. The STEPS modules each focus on a specific issue and offer solutions, steps for implementation, case studies, CME opportunities and downloadable additional tools.

In addition, the physician group has launched a podcast series, Inside Medicare’s New Payment System, featuring acting CMS administrator Andy Slavitt, AMA staff experts and other healthcare leaders. The series, which will include five episodes, should help get physicians up to speed on MACRA-related changes. I for one am eager to hear what Slavitt has to say about MACRA, as he is about the best source on the subject you could have.

At first glance, it doesn’t seem that the AMA plans to spend a lot of time on the Advancing Care Information subset of MIPS, better known as the replacement for the Meaningful Use program. I guess that’s not a huge surprise, given that physicians are still grappling with broad implications of MACRA which go well beyond HIT issues. However, given how important Meaningful Use has been to physicians over the past few years, one might expect it to get a little bit of special attention. Maybe they’re waiting for the MACRA final rule to come out.

With CMS casting a wider net and looking for more from medical practices than just adequate levels of EMR adoption, the AMA is probably following CMS’ path in talking about more than just the meaningful use (Advancing Care Information) portion of MACRA.

Be sure to check out all of our MACRA Monday blog posts where we dive into the details of the MACRA Quality Payment Program.