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#HIMSS18 First Day:  A Haze Of Uncertainty

Posted on March 7, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Entering the HIMSS exhibit area always feels like walking straight into a hurricane. But if you know how to navigate the show, things usually start to come into focus.

There’s a bunch of young, scrappy and hungry startups clustered in a hive, a second tier of more-established but still emerging ventures and a scattering of non-healthcare contenders hoping to crack the market. And of course, there are the dream places put in place by usual suspects like Accenture, SAP and Citrix. (I also stumbled across a large data analytics company, the curiously-named splunk> — I kid you not – whose pillars of data-like moving color squares might have been the most spectacular display on the floor.)

The point I’m trying to make here is that as immense and overwhelming as a show like HIMSS can be, there’s a certain order amongst the chaos. And I usually leave with an idea of which technologies are on the ascendance, and which seem the closest to practical deployment. This time, not so much.

I may have missed something, but my sense on first glance that I was surrounded by solutions that were immature, off-target or backed by companies trying to be all things to all people. Also, surprisingly few even spoke the word “doctor” when describing their product.

For example, a smallish HIT company probably can’t address IoT, population health, social determinants data and care coordination in one swell foop, but I ran into more than one that was trying to do something like this.

All told, I came away with a feeling that many vendors are trapped in a haze of uncertainty right now. To be fair, I understand why. Most are trying to build solutions without knowing the answers to some important questions.

What are the best uses of blockchain, if any? What role should AI play in data analytics, care management and patient interaction? How do we best define population health management? How should much-needed care coordination technologies be architected, and how will they fit into physician workflow?

Yes, I know that vendors’ job is to sort these things like these out and solve the problems effectively. But this year, many seem to be struggling far more than usual.

Meanwhile, I should note that there seems to be a mismatch between what vendors showed up and what providers say that they want. Why so few vendors focused on RCM or cybersecurity, for example? I know that to some extent, HIMSS is about emerging tech rather than existing solutions, but the gap between practical and emerging solutions seemed larger than usual.

Don’t get me wrong – I’m learning a lot here. The wonderful buzz of excited conversations in the hall is as intense as always. And the show is epic and entertaining as always. Let’s hope that next year, the fog has cleared.

Low-Profile HIT Player Leidos A Major Presence

Posted on June 1, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Here where I live in the Washington, DC metro, federal IT is a major presence. Government IT consulting firms cluster along the area’s highways, and their executives own countless sprawling manses in the nearby suburbs. Those players include Leidos, a northern Virginia-based contracting firm with clients in IT, biomedical research and public health.

Though the firm has annual revenues of about $5.1 billion, and 18,000 employees, Leidos generates little fanfare here, despite a pedigree that includes a $5 billion partnership with Lockheed Martin’s Information Systems & Global Solutions segment that provides IT and intelligence services. However, Leidos is actually the new identity of long-established power player SAIC, which restructured and changed its name in late 2013 and has deep roots in national security and government IT contracting.

Most readers probably care little about government IT unless they service that industry. But I’d argue that we should all know about Leidos Health which, among other distinctions, was part of the team (Cerner, Leidos and Accenture Federal) that won the $4.3 billion plus contract to implement an EMR for the US Department of Defense last summer.

The DoD contract was hotly contested, by teams that included an Epic, IBM and Impact Advisors combination, but the Cerner-fronted team pulled off a win that may have saved the EMR vendor’s brand in a brutally competitive market. While it’s not clear what role Leidos played in the win, a DoD official was quoted as saying that a Cerner deal was projected to be “much cheaper,” and it’s possible Leidos support pricing played some role in its calculations. Perhaps more tellingly, DoD officials said cybersecurity considerations played a major role in the award, which plays to Leidos’ strengths.

Leidos Health hasn’t had unmitigated success. Most recently, it was part of a team scheduled to assist with a little-mentioned Epic EMR rollout for the US Coast Guard, which was cancelled due to “various irregularities.” The Coast Guard, which pulled the plug on the rollout in April, had been planning its EMR implementation since 2010.

However, this probably wasn’t much of a setback. And Leidos still delivers health IT services to several other federal agencies, including HHS and the Department of Veterans Affairs, including cybersecurity, health analytics, IT infrastructure and support and software development. And it works with the gamut of enterprise EMR vendors, including Allscripts, Cerner, Epic, McKesson and Meditech.

Truth be told, Leidos may not deserve the “quiet company” label given to it by Healthcare Informatics magazine, which recently dubbed it one the most interesting vendors of 2016. I’m sure Beltway execs who compete for federal contracts are well aware of Leidos Health, which had annual revenues of $593 million last year. And government IT decision-makers are well acquainted with parent company SAIC, a pillar of federal contracting which has been in the business since 1969. (In fact, SAIC president of technology and engineering Deborah Lee James was sworn in as Secretary of the Air Force in late 2013.)

That being said, the DoD deal has dramatically raised Leidos Health’s visibility in the broader health IT world. It will be interesting to see what it does going forward, don’t you think?