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7 Tips to Help Improve EHR Etiquette

Posted on March 6, 2013 I Written By

Dr. West is an endocrinologist in private practice in Washington, DC. He completed fellowship training in Endocrinology and Metabolism at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Dr. West opened The Washington Endocrine Clinic, PLLC in 2009. He can be contacted at doctorwestindc@gmail.com.

It’s been a while since I’ve written, but only because my practice has been booming lately and I’ve barely had a moment to breathe here in DC.  But I’m back now, and for who knows how long given the waves tossing on the sea of digital medical practice!

Patient engagement continues to be one of the most common complaints about EMR software.  There was even a mention of the frustrations in a previous post on Happy EMR Doctor.  Many physicians say that it interferes with patient interactions and that now most of their time is spent looking at a computer monitor and updating charts.  This causes frustration for all parties – patients and physicians – because doctors did not sign up for computer duty when they went to medical school and patients expect a doctor’s full attention during visits.

Software Advice, a website that reviews medical software, launched a survey on how to improve doctor-patient interactions in the EMR era and the results are finally in.  See below for the top seven tips received on maintaining quality relationships:

1. Position your computer between you and the patient:  No brainer here.  Face the patient during interactions.  Take the time to plan where your equipment will go so that this possible.

2. Invest in mobility:  Whether it’s a small rolling desk, small tablets or other lightweight tools, choose equipment that helps you move around.  A laptop may cost an extra buck but can be worth the investment.

3. Delegate as much as possible:  The objective is to interact with the patient as much as possible.  Have staff members enter the medical history, medications, prior procedures, etc. prior to the patient’s visit so you don’t have to during the appointment.

4. Dictate as much as possible:  Talk with the patient while scribes enter the information or use dictation software.  These allow you to focus more on the patient.

5. Ignore the computer when you first enter the room:  Chat with your patient for a few minute before you start recording information in the digital record.

6. Ask about previous complaints:  If the patient information is pre-loaded, look over it before entering the room. If they have open complaints, ask them about the issues to close them out in the emr. This reaffirms to the patient that you care.

7. Finish the chart in the room:  This can help to answer any other questions that might come up so patients feel like they have been listened to.

All in all, EMRs take some getting used to.  Once a physician develops a rhythm with the software, every patient interaction becomes easier.  Focus on the tasks as they come, and remember, practice makes perfect.

Funny Physician Exam Room EHR Etiquette Video

Posted on July 30, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I usually reserve the various EHR videos I find for the Healthcare Scene EHR video website. However, this one was too funny to not share with a wider audience. Here’s the YouTube description for the video:

Meaningful Use of Electronic Health Records (EHRs) involves more than implementing an EHR. It involves interacting with patients and the computer in the exam room in a way that is productive and enhances the interaction between the patient and the physician. Learn about how Reliant Medical Group (formerly known as Fallon Clinic) uses Kaiser Permanente’s LEVEL technique to ensure a successful patient encounter.

While I’ve said that the video is funny, it also does bring out some really important points about physician exam room EHR etiquette. When I first started watching the video I was wondering how they were going to get physicians to actually take the time to watch the video. Then, about half way through I was laughing at the video which made me watch through more of it. I’m not sure if the humor was intentional or not, but I expect those reading this site will get a good laugh at the video embedded below while seeing some important points on EHR etiquette.

Thanks to Carl Bergman for pointing the video out to me.