Free EMR Newsletter Want to receive the latest news on EMR, Meaningful Use, ARRA and Healthcare IT sent straight to your email? Join thousands of healthcare pros who subscribe to EMR and EHR for FREE!

Ophthalmologists Worry That EHRs Decrease Productivity, Boost Costs

Posted on January 16, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

A new study has concluded that while EHR use among ophthalmologists has shot up over the last decade, most of these doctors see the systems as lowering their productivity and increasing their office costs, according to a survey published in JAMA Ophthalmology.

To conduct the study, the researchers emailed surveys to 2,000 ophthalmologists between 2015 and 2016. The 2,000 respondents, whose responses were anonymous, were chosen out of more than 18,000 active US members of the American Academy of Ophthalmology.

The researchers involved found that the EHR adoption rate for ophthalmologists, which is about 72.1%, was similar to rates among other specialties. Nonetheless, it’s a big jump from 2011, when only 47% of the 492 respondents reported using EHRs in their practice.

Most respondents were devoted solely to ophthalmology and had an average of 22 years of practice. They had an average of 5.3 years of EHR use, but nearly the entire group had previously used paper records. Eighty-eight percent of those currently using EHRs had been present for the transition from paper records to digital ones, researchers found.

Not surprisingly, given typical EHR acquisition and maintenance costs, the mean number of ophthalmologists in a given practice was higher among those with an EHR in place than practices without one. Researchers found that when practices were part of an integrated health system, a government health system, the higher the odds of their having adopted an EHR.

While the adoption rate has increased, ophthalmologists actually seem less happy with EHRs than they had been before. For example, many reported that they felt EHRs were undermining both their productivity and financial situation.

For example, more than half of respondents in 2016 reported that their patients seen per day had fallen since adopting EHRs. That’s an unfortunate change in perceptions since in 2006, more than 60% of ophthalmologists saw an increase in productivity after their EHR system was implemented.

Meanwhile, respondents were ambivalent about the impact of EHR use on revenue, with 35% reporting that revenue had remained the same after adoption, 41% a decrease and almost 9% an increase.

Despite concerns that EHRs were undercutting practice productivity, researchers reported that three previous studies of academic ophthalmology practices found no change in patient volume after EHR adoption.

There also seems to be a disconnect between what ophthalmologists think their patients want technically and what they want.  While 76% reported that their patients felt mostly positive or neutral toward EHR use, 36% of ophthalmologists would return to paper records if they had the chance.

That being said, ophthalmology practices do seem to see the benefits in keeping their EHR systems in place. For example, despite the fact that 68% saw paper documentation as faster, 53% of respondents felt their EHRs were generating net positive value.

All told, it seems that ophthalmologists’ concerns about EHR use are working themselves out. However, it also seems as though the doubts we see documented here are deeply rooted and may not go away quickly.

Survey: Physician EHR Satisfaction and EHR Productivity

Posted on July 8, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Chip Hart from Pediatric EHR Solutions sent me the results of the Physicians’ Alliance of America EHR survey results. The chart that’s most interesting to me is this one that shows Productivity Levle with an EHR:
EHR Productivity Chart

If you look at this chart, it clearly illustrates that most doctors see EHR as damaging to their productivity level. No doubt, this chart has a strong connection with why many doctors dislike EHR. However, it’s worth also noting that this chart shows a doctors’ perceived productivity. Many times people think it’s more, but we aren’t great at actually measuring how much time it takes to do something. Plus, most doctors quickly write off the time they spent chasing down charts and other time savings that should also be associated with their productivity. Instead, they just focus on the time spent charting in paper against the time spent charting in an EHR. Unfortunately, there isn’t a really easy way to measure how the actual productivity level changed.

Regardless of whether EHR has really killed productivity level or not, perception is reality and so perception is very important. What’s even more interesting about this chart is that despite the perception that EHR hurts their productivity, 80% of those surveyed said they prefer electronic to paper. This figure seems at odds with the graph above.

I think this illustrates the reality of the future of EHR. It’s not going anywhere. Doctors aren’t leaving EHR to go back to paper. So, now we’re faced with the reality that we need to optimize our current EHR implementations so that they can be a productivity benefit to a practice in both perception and reality. Can we do that with meaningful use stage 3 continuing to kill EHR innovation?

New Nursing Journey, Healthcare Interoperability, and EMR Productivity

Posted on June 23, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This is a great post by a nurse heading back into nursing. My suggestions for Jen is to dive in head first and learn the product in and out. Every EMR has issues, but you want to get to know those issues and the workarounds for those issues as soon as you can. Once you do, then at least they’re issues you know about and know how to deal with.


Depends on the vendor. More importantly, many institutions don’t want interoperability either. A number of times just this week people have told me that healthcare organizations don’t want to share with “their competitor.” Many are going to be taken kicking and screaming into interoperability.


This is the fear for many. I hope they just calculate in how fast paper charting was.