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Top 10 Blog Posts on EMR and EHR from 2017

Posted on January 4, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As we kick off 2018, I thought it would be fun to look back at the top 10 blog posts (based on views) in 2017 for EMR and EHR. It’s always great to see what people found interesting and which topics were of interest to readers. Plus, I’m always fascinated to see what old articles are still of interest to people. Not to mention, to look at what has changed since the article was written.

Facebook in Healthcare – What’s amazing about this blog post is that it’s from 2014. Looking back 3+ years later, I haven’t really seen Facebook become a big player in healthcare. Sure, there are plenty of patient groups on Facebook, but it’s not really a Facebook product. Facebook has done a number of things in healthcare over the years to get the word out about organ donation and things like that, but I currently don’t see them as a big player in healthcare the same way Amazon, Google, and Apple are looking at healthcare.

What the EMR Industry Can Learn From Facebook – Amazing that another article about Facebook was in the Top 10 and this one from 2012 was written by Priya Ramchandran. Her vision of a world where a patients health record was just automatically pushed down to a server every time we have a health encounter has been far from realized. The challenge of the comparison for me is that Facebook has a reason to push all that data together. In healthcare, there are reasons why organizations don’t want to push the data out to the patient. Until we change those reasons, we won’t see this vision despite hundreds of companies efforts to try and accomplish it. Yes, even Apple is working on solving this problem now and I think they’ll fail.

Epic Launches FHIR-Based App Platform – Epic’s launch of the Epic App Orchard platform was big news in 2017. I’ll admit that I’m still a bit skeptical about Epic App Orchard. Many herald it as Epic opening up their EHR to developers. I personally am skeptical and fear that it’s really just making public the connections they were already creating and is more PR than anything. Epic App Orchard isn’t a truly open API that would allow innovators and entrepreneurs to build on top of the Epic EHR. Plus, I fear that Epic App Orchard is just a new revenue stream for Epic. Those are my fears that I’ll be exploring as I talk to people in 2018 about it.

Publicly Traded Health IT Companies – I wouldn’t have thought of this blog post as one that would have garnered a lot of attention. Maybe that means we should do more work covering the publicly traded healthcare IT companies on this blog. They seem to be increasingly dominating the landscape.

Artificial Intelligence in Healthcare: Medical Ethics and the Machine Revolution – One of the great additions to EMR and EHR this year was Janae Sharp and this blog post was an excellent example of her work. Understanding the impact of AI in healthcare is going to be an extremely important topic over the next decade. I’m glad she kicked off the conversation since it’s a challenging one. I still keep thinking about the question she asked, “Can a machine learn empathy?” Chew on that one for a while.

EHR Innovation & Regulation: Friends or Foes? – I’m really glad that this post by Stephen Dart from AdvancedMD did so well. I think most doctors don’t appreciate the challenging situation EHR vendors are in when it comes to balancing compliance and innovation. I believe it’s the core of what’s wrong with most EHR software out there and contributes to a lot of physician burnout.

Is Cerner Edging Up On Epic? – This post was from 2016, but the question is still a good one. The reality is that both Cerner and Epic are doing amazingly well. I don’t see anything on the horizon that’s going to change it. Both of them are behemoths that are doing incredibly well. I don’t really see either of them cutting into the progress of the other either. What do you think?

Is Your Health Data Unstructured? – Enabling an AI Powered Healthcare Future – I still love the insight shared in this article. Technology doesn’t solve your problems. Technology amplifies your current state. If you’re doing a good job, technology will accelerate the good. If you’re doing poorly on something, technology will accelerate and amplify the bad.

#HIMSS17 Mix Tape – This is just a fun post leading into HIMSS that Colin has done every year with us for a lot of years. The exciting part is that when Colin posted this he was still working at a Healthcare IT vendor. We’re lucky to now have him formally as part of the Healthcare Scene team. I’m quite sure Colin will be doing a #HIMSS18 Mix Tape shortly. So, if you have suggestions, reach out to him on Twitter.

12 Reasons Why EMRs Improve Patient Care – How amazing that this post from 2011 is still doing so well. I imagine it’s because so many people are trying to understand the value of the EHR. Especially as it related to improving patient care. This post really deserves a future dedicated blog post to look at the 12 ways EMR improve patient care and how many of them have been realized. I’ll put it on my to-do list for 2018.

There you have it. The top 10 blog posts on EMR and EHR for 2017. It’s always fun to look back and see what’s changed and what’s stayed the same. Thanks to each of you for reading and supporting the work we do here. Now on to an awesome 2018!

EMR Mandate Delay, Patient Focused EMR, and Guaranteed EHR Benefit

Posted on October 27, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.


This article makes some interesting points about the challenge of EMR. However, I don’t think there’s any shot that the EHR train is going to slow down. At the best there might be a delay in meaningful use stage 2. Although, that could be unlikely as well. P.S. There is no EMR Mandate.


Not true. It takes GREAT EMR design to do that. The regulations are just brutal and don’t focus on the patient.


It’s always beautiful for me to find someone tweeting a blog post I created 4 years earlier. The content is still quite good. Reminds me that I need to finish my EHR Benefits series.

EMR Analysis Detects Childrens’ Growth Disorders

Posted on September 16, 2013 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

EMRs can be used to detect growth disorders in children, according to new research published in the Journal of the American Medical Association . The study, which was written up in FierceEMR, used a special automated growth monitoring algorithm integrated into an EMR system to track childrens’ growth.

To conduct the study, researchers compared three “control” years to an “intervention” year. An annual average of 33,029 children were screened, according to FierceEMR.

Researchers found that in a control year an average of four children were diagnosed with a growth disorder. During the intervention year, however, 28 new diagnoses of growth disorders were made among 32,404 children, FierceEMR reports.

Looked at another way, the rate of growth disorder diagnoses was 0.1 per 1000 screened children in the control years versus 0.9 per 1000 screened children in the intervention year, FierceEMR noted.

These study results are part of an emerging body of literature suggesting that EMRs to help clinicians detect and manage disease states.

For example, another study appearing in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that EMRs can be associated with a drop in emergency department visits and hospitalizations among diabetics.  That study, which analyzed all of the 169,711 records for patients enrolled in the Kaiser Permanente Northern California diabetes registry during a four-year period, found a 10.5% decline in hospitalizations for preventable ambulatory care sensitive conditions where EMRs were in use.

Another study, which recently appeared in BMJ Quality & Safety, recently concluded that EMRs can help reduce hospital readmissions of high-risk heart failure patients by sorting out high from low risk patients in the ED.

Bill Gates Puts a New Spin on the Great EMR Debate

Posted on May 13, 2013 I Written By

As Social Marketing Director at Billian, Jennifer Dennard is responsible for the continuing development and implementation of the company's social media strategies for Billian's HealthDATA and Porter Research. She is a regular contributor to a number of healthcare blogs and currently manages social marketing channels for the Health IT Leadership Summit and Technology Association of Georgia’s Health Society. You can find her on Twitter @JennDennard.

I heard an interesting interview on NPR the other day with Bill Gates on the subject of polio eradication. The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation has been working for a number of years now on the effort, and are intent on seeing that no child ever becomes paralyzed as a result of the disease. The interview got me thinking about money, as NPR host Robert Siegel grilled Gates about the cost of this hopefully final vaccination push in the three countries that still show cases of it each year – Afghanistan, Pakistan and Nigeria.

According to Gates, a nice tidy sum of $5.5 billion will be necessary to vaccinate enough children to finally push out the disease. The question arose as to whether or not this money will be spent wisely. Could it be put to better, more effective use fighting other healthcare conditions, such as malaria, that affect greater numbers of people? Gates made the point that once polio is eradicated, the enormous amount of money already being spent on fighting it can then be spent on these other issues – a statement that to me didn’t seem to sit well with Siegel.

Now, if you’re in healthcare, chances are money crosses your mind a few times a day. And if you use an EMR, you’ve likely voiced an opinion or two on whether it has lived up to its promised value. I think Gates’ point above on cost effectiveness of disease eradication – the most expensive disease gets eradicated first to free up its funds for other healthcare causes – can be applied to the EMR ROI debate.

Yes, healthcare is expensive. Yes, current and possibly future EMRs may not have the best interfaces or give the ideal user experience. But, given time (perhaps a lot of time), they will ultimately help springboard immense cost savings throughout the industry. I consider them the backbone of interoperability, especially when it comes to health information exchange and accountable care – two notions that might just become the norm once EMR utilization finally reaches critical mass.

Stage 2 Meaningful Use will likely see a shift in the market, and from what I’ve read thus far, is causing providers to think about Meaningful Use in a new way. It might be a hiccup in this journey to cost savings, but it will likely separate the wheat from the chaff as far as vendors go. Hopefully, only effective products will be left standing, which will in turn make it easier for providers to use EMRs in the most effective way.

Money will of course be on everyone’s minds at the upcoming HFMA ANI show in Orlando. This has got to be one of my favorite events as it is smaller than HIMSS but still has that bustling, breaking news vibe. I’ll be interested to hear from providers their opinions on the recent push for greater price transparency when it comes to hospital costs, and how they are feeling about EMRs as of late. It will also be interesting to see how vendors are helping these providers meet Stage 2 and patient engagement head on.

Will you be at the ANI show? Drop me a line in the comments below and let me know what you’re looking forward to learning about or seeing the most.

EMR A Disappointment In The US?

Posted on January 15, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Twitter has been circulating tweets discussing whether EMR is a disappointment in the USA. I find the question really intriguing. I’m sure the doctors who have their EMR and love the benefits they’ve gotten from EMR think its far from a disappointment. The doctors that have an EMR forced on them or select one that kills their workflow likely see EMR as a huge disappointment. Whether EMR is a disappointment in the US starts with which group you think is larger.

My personal gut feeling is that it’s likely split somewhere down the middle. About half of doctors are satisfied with their EMR, and half of doctors are unsatisfied (some might use a much harsher word) with their EMR software.

Does that mean that EMR is a disppointment in the US? I’d have to say it does.

Although, I think that disappointment is the right word. It’s not that I think we shouldn’t be doing EMR. We absolutely should be making physician documentation electronic. As I’ve been starting to highlight in my EMR Benefit Series on EMR and HIPAA, there are some major issues with paper charts that are easily solved with EMR.

The reason EMR has a been a disappointment to date is that EMR implementations can be so much better than they are today.

I believe we are sitting on so much possibility when it comes to how healthcare IT can transform healthcare. For a myriad of reasons, we’re not seeing that potential and quite frankly that’s disappointing.

Study: EMRs Improve Ambulatory Care

Posted on October 30, 2012 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

A new study done by researchers from the Weill Cornell Medical College has concluded that community-based physicians who move to EMRs can improve care meaningfully.

The study, which was done in collaboration with New York’s Health Information Technology Collaborative, gathered baseline year data gathered from 500+ physicians in ambulatory practices and 75,000 patients with five different health plans in New York’s Hudson Valley.  They then compared quality scores for EMR-using physicians and those without EMRs.

Researchers concluded that 56 percent of physicians who were using EMRs scored significantly higher on quality of care provided, particularly in managing chlamydia, diabetes, colorectal cancer and breast cancer.  A combined score across nine quality measures also also suggested that EMRs helped generated better care than paper-based records overall.

What made the study results particularly interesting, researchers said, was that the physicians using EMRs used off-the-shelf systems which hadn’t been specialized to achieve these kind of results.

Researchers seem to think that the improved ambulatory results are just the tip of the iceberg:

EHRs may improve the quality of care by making information more accessible to physicians, providing medical decision-making support in real time and allowing patients and providers to communicate regularly and securely,” says Dr. Rainu Kaushal, director of the Center for Healthcare Informatics and Policy and the Frances and John L. Loeb Professor of Medical Informatics at Weill Cornell. “However, the real value of these systems is their ability to organize data and to allow transformative models of health care delivery, such as the patient-centered medical home, to be layered on top.” 

Interesting. I would have assumed that reminders and warnings had generated , as they certainly help doctors make sure overworked doctors are on target with tests, avoid drug interactions and the like. But researchers like Dr. Kaushal and her colleagues seem to think that the big EMR payoff will come as EMR systems change the core models doctors use to deliver care.

Given that new models are all but inevitable at this point, I guess we’ll get to find out!

EHR Budgeting Webinar Slides

Posted on April 20, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The HIT Community recently did a webinar on EHR budgeting that I found quite interesting. Looking at the slides (embedded below), you can see that it covers a number of the important factors related to budgeting for an EHR. They talk about various cost savings and expenses you’ll have. I love that this goes beyond the EHR incentive money.

I’ve covered a lot of these various items before and I have them listed on my EHR & EMR benefits page. I also go into detail on most of them in my EHR selection e-book.

Now for their presentation slides:

You can find a link to the Live recording of the webinar on the HIT Community website.

Costs of Healthcare, Benefits of Healthcare IT and Health Tracking at #chs11

Posted on October 21, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Seems like people really liked my tweets from yesterday at the Connected Health Symposium. So, I thought I’d do it again today. Here’s some of the interesting tweets I saw and wrote during the Connected Health Symposium.


The cost of healthcare was a major theme throughout the entire conference. I agree completely that as patients start to pay more of their healthcare, they need more information and make better decisions.


I found this really interesting. Twitter (and even this blog) doesn’t quite capture the irony of the statement. Basically, Dr. Tippets from Verizon really highlights how if we did IT right in healthcare we have the potential of saving lives and live longer. Both noble goals.


I think Blumenthal might have actually said Healthcare IT instead of EHR, but there’s a lot of overlap in this. I agree with Blumenthal that the media and even blogs like mine love to write about the negative more than the positive. It makes for a compelling headline. Maybe the people behind the good research studies need to promote themselves more too.


This kind of hit me on multiple levels. First, I found it interesting that 15% are tracking their weight and exercise. Is that too low? It’s probably the highest level of any other healthcare data tracking app. I wonder where the rest of the apps stand. The second thing that hit me was the fact that doctors aren’t using this data. Finding some way to make it easy and useful for doctors to use all this collected information is going to be a challenging, but important next step. I’ll be interested to see how EHR companies work through the process of taking that data and integrating it into their EHR software. It won’t be easy, but I believe patients will love this type of integration. Plus, it would encourage many others to start using these medical devices.

Does an EMR Improve Patient Care?

Posted on September 16, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Everyone probably realizes by now that I love to read first hand experiences with EMR and EHR. I guess I’ve always loved stories and I’ve always loved to tell stories, so maybe that’s where that comes from. I guess this is why I loved Katherine Rourke’s post called “Would An EMR Have Improved My Son’s ED Care?” on the Hospital EMR and EHR website. It’s a great read if you love first hand experiences with EMR as I do.

Katherine does raise a challenging question, “Does an EMR improve patient care?”

In past presentations, I’ve always put the idea of an EMR improving patient care under the “possible EHR benefits.” (See a full list of EMR and EHR Benefits) As many things in life there’s a big “Depends!” that is the b est answer to that question. The answer to this question depends on what kind of care you were offering previously, the type of care you offer, the EMR you chose, the features you chose to employ in that EMR, the match between your workflow and the EMR workflow, and I’m sure another dozen other depends as well.

What’s more important to point out is that an EMR can improve patient care. I certainly can’t guarantee that an EMR will improve patient care in your clinic, but I’ve seen many cases where it has improved patient care and so I know it’s possible. The biggest determining factor in whether an EMR will improve patient care in your clinic is your desire to have it do so.

Many times in life, you get what you want. Do you want an EMR to improve your patient care? Or were you too focused on wanting to get the EHR Incentive money? Not that these and other benefits are mutually exclusive, but the focus of your EHR implementation matters a lot. Make sure you’re focused on the right things and your EMR selection and implementation will go 100 times better. In fact, it will even improve patient care if you want it to.

Will EMR Vendors Cut Through The Noise This Year?

Posted on February 25, 2011 I Written By

Katherine Rourke is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Folks,  as an editor covering this industry I’ve read more EMR vendor news, pored over more of their press releases and taken in more their advertising pitches than most.   Despite that, I’ve seldom walked away with a clear sense of why that vendor was truly special.

While that’s never a good thing for any vendor, it’s a particularly bad problem in 2011, which, I predict, will make or break many smaller EMR developers.  If it was hard to get buyers’ attention over the last two years — especially that of fearful physicians — it’s going to be a Herculean challenge this year.  The noise level is higher than a pack of screaming fans at a Metallica concert.

I’m not suggesting that EMRs have become a commodity like John suggested was a possibility (the real problem is how diverse they are, in fact!) but I am saying that many are still doing a terrible job of setting themselves apart.  Too much of the content churned out by EMR vendors makes appallingly broad generalizations or strings together a list of “me-too” features.

I do sympathize, tremendously, with the struggle health IT marketers go through in trying to sell such a complex product in a way which clearly communicates:

*  Affordability
*  Easy maintenance
*  Easy-to-establish productivity
*  Reliability

and in the case of selling to larger entities like hospitals:

*  Interoperability
*  Data integrity
*  Intelligently designed infrastructure
*  Scalability
*  And much, much more!

Still, there’s no getting around the fact that they’ve got to get the job done.  This year, if an EMR vendor seems like a me-too, they’ll be history in 18 months, tops.   Like it or not, the time has come to put up (a clear message) or shut up.