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Value Based Care: We Need a Better Health IT System to Measure It

Posted on April 16, 2018 I Written By

Healthcare as a Human Right. Physician Suicide Loss Survivor. Janae writes about Artificial Intelligence, Virtual Reality, Data Analytics, Engagement and Investing in Healthcare. twitter: @coherencemed

At HIMSS this year in Las Vegas I looked at the nature of the EHR and if we have the current computing and data infrastructure to enable better value based care.  Our data capabilities are failing to allow providers to align reimbursement with great care delivery.

Under the premise of “what gets watched gets done”, we understand that improving care delivery will require us to align incentives with desired outcomes. The challenge is that, among the many ills plaguing our version of the truth mined from data found in electronic health records systems, reimbursement data presents the core issue for informatics departments across the country. To resolve this issue, we need documentation to reflect the care we are delivering, and we need care delivery to center around patient care. Health information management should be heavily involved in data capture. To truly improve care, we need better tools to measure it, and healthcare data is expanding to answer difficult questions about care delivery and cost.

Our first challenge is stemming the proliferation of extraneous documentation, and healthcare is still addressing this issue. What used to be written on a 3-by-5 index card (and sometimes via illegible doctor’s notes) is now a single point in a huge electronic record that is, surprisingly, not portable. Central to our issues around the cost of care, we have also seen that quantity is valued more than quality in care delivery.

Duplicated testing or unnecessary procedures are grimly accepted as standard practice within the business of medicine. Meaningless and siloed care delivery only helps this issue proliferate across the health of a population. To resolve these issues, our workflow and records need to capture the outcomes we are trying to obtain and must be customized for the incentives of every party.

Incentives for providers and hospital administrators should center around value: delivering the best outcomes, rather than doing more tests. Carefully mapping the processes of healthcare delivery and looking at the resource costs at the medical condition level, from the personnel costs of everyone involved to perform a medical procedure to the cost of the medical device itself, moves organizations closer to understanding total actual costs of care.  Maximizing value in healthcare–higher quality care at lower costs–involves a closer look and better understanding of costs at the medical condition level. Value and incentives alignment should provide the framework for health records infrastructure.

When you walk into Starbucks, your app will tell you what song is playing and offer options to get extra points based on what you usually order. Starbucks understands their value to the customer and the cost of their products to serve them. From the type of bean, to the seasonal paper cup, to the amount of time it takes to make the perfect pumpkin spice latte, Starbucks develops products with their audience in mind–and they know both how much this production costs and how much the user is willing to pay. The cost of each experience starts well before the purchase of the beverage. For Starbucks, they know their role is more than how many lattes they sell; it is to deliver a holistic experience; delight the customer each time.  

Healthcare has much to learn about careful cost analysis from the food and beverage retail industry, including how to use personalized medicine to deliver the best care. Value-Based Healthcare reporting will help the healthcare industry as a whole move beyond the catch-up game we currently play and be proactive in promoting health with a precise knowledge of individual needs and cost of care. The investment into quantifying healthcare delivery very precisely and defining personal treatment will have massive investments in the coming years and deliver better care at a lowered cost. Do current healthcare information systems and analytics have the capacity to record this type of cost analysis?

“Doctors want to deliver the best outcomes for their patients. They’re highly trained professionals. Value Based Healthcare allows you to implement a framework so every member of the care team operates at the top of his or her license.”

-Mahek Shah, MD of Harvard Business School.

These outcomes should be based on the population a given hospital serves, the group of people being treated, or at the medical condition level. Measures of good outcomes are dynamic and personalized to a population. One of the difficulties in healthcare is that while providers are working hard for the patient, healthcare systems are also working to make a profit.

It is possible to do well while doing good, but these two goals are seemingly in conflict within the billion dollar healthcare field. Providing as many services as possible in a fee-for-service-based system can obfuscate the goal of providing great healthcare. Many patients have seen multiple tests and unnecessary procedures that seem to be aligned with the incentive of getting more codes recorded for billing as opposed to better health outcomes for the patients.  

The work of Value Based Time Data Activity Based Costing can improve personalized delivery for delivery in underserved populations as well as for affluent populations. The World Health Organization (WHO) published the work of improving care delivery in Haiti. This picture of the care delivery team is population-specific. A young person after an accident will have different standards for what constitutes “right care right time right place” than a veteran with PTSD. Veterans might need different coverage than members of the general public, so value based care for a specific group of veterans might incorporate more mental health and behavioral health treatment than value based care serving the frail elderly, which could incorporate more palliative care and social (SDoH) care. Measuring costs with TDABC for that specific population would include not just the cost of specialists specific to each segment of the population, but of the entire team (social worker, nursing, nutritionist, psychologists) that is needed to deliver the right care, achieve the best outcomes, and meet the needs of the patient segment.

Healthcare systems are bombing providers and decision makers with information and trying to ferret out what that information really means. Where is it meaningful? Actionable? Process improvement teams for healthcare should look carefully at data with a solid strategy. This can start with cost analysis specific to given target populations. Frequently, the total cost of care delivery is not well understood, from the time spent at the clinic to prescribe a hip replacement to the time in the OR, to recovery time; capturing a better view includes accounting for every stage of care. Surgeons with better outcomes also have a lower total long-term cost of care, which impacts long-term expenses involved when viewing it through the lens of an entire care cycle. If you are a great surgeon–meaning your outcomes are better than others–you should get paid for it. The best care should be facilitated and compensated, rather than the greatest number of billing codes recorded. Capturing information about outcomes and care across multiple delivery areas means data must be more usable and more fluid than before.

Healthcare informatics systems should streamline the processes that are necessary to patient care and provider compensation. The beginning of this streamlined delivery involves capturing a picture of best care and mapping the cost of processes of care. The initial investment of TDABC in researching these care costs at the patient level can be a huge barrier for healthcare systems with small margins and limited resources. This alignment is an investment in your long-term viability and success.

Once you understand your underlying costs to deliver care, health systems will be better prepared to negotiate value-based payment contracts with payers and direct-to-employers. Pair your measurement of costs with your outcomes. Integrating care delivery with outcomes standards has improved in recent times through ICHOM. Medical systems need to incentivize health if healthy patients are a priority.  The analysis of specific costs to a system needs a better reporting system than a charge master or traditional EHR which is strongly designed toward recording fee for service work. We must align or incentives and our health IT with our desired outcomes in healthcare. The more billing codes I can create in an electronic health record, the more I am reimbursed. Reimbursement alignment should match desired outcomes and physicians operating at top of their license.

Under value-based care, health and well-being become a priority whereby often in the fee-for-service model, sickness can be the priority because you get paid by doing more interventions, which may not lead to the best outcomes. The careful measurement of care (i.e. TDABC) paired with standards of best care will improve care delivery and reduce the cost of that care delivery. Insights about improved models and standards of care for outcomes and healthcare delivery allow patients, providers, and administrators to align with the shared goal of healthier patient populations. I am looking forward to the data infrastructure to catch up with these goals of better care delivery and a great patient experience.

 

Self-Learning Analytics and Making Analytics Useful

Posted on April 2, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

One of the shocks to me at HIMSS 2018 was that there wasn’t nearly as much discussion around healthcare analytics as I thought there would be. I thought for sure we’d see an explosion of proven analytics that healthcare organizations could start to take advantage of. Maybe I just missed it, but I certainly didn’t see anything all that new.

It’s too bad because that’s one of the huge opportunities I see for healthcare. I was looking through some old notes from conferences and saw a note where I wrote: “What you do with the data is the competitive differentiator, not the data.

Certainly, you need access to the data to be successful, but there are a lot of organizations out there which have access to health data and they’re not making any sort of dent. Many of the now defunct HIEs had access to the data, but they didn’t know what to do with all that data. I’m still on the search for more analytics which are useful.

One other idea I found in my notes was the concept of a self-learning analytic. Related to this was the discussion we had about black box analytics in a recent #HITsm Twitter chat. I don’t think they have to be the same, but I do think that the key to successful healthcare analytics is going to require some component of self-learning.

The concept is simple. The analytic should look at its past recommendations and then based on the results of past recommendations, the analytic should adjust future recommendations. Notice that I still call it recommendations which I think is still the right approach for most analytics. This approach to constantly learning and evolving analytics is why it’s so hard to regulate healthcare analytics. It’s hard to regulate moving targets and a self-learning analytic needs to be moving to be most effective.

This is possibly why we haven’t seen an explosion of healthcare analytics. It’s hard to get them right and to prove their effectiveness. Plus, they need to continually evolve and improve. That’s the opposite of what researchers want to hear.

This is why the future of healthcare analytics is going to require deep collaboration between healthcare analytics vendors and provider organizations. It’s not a black box that you can buy and implement. At least not yet.

What’s been your experience with healthcare analytics? Where are you seeing success? We’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments.

Meet the #HIMSS18 Press – A Wrapup Discussion of the Conference

Posted on March 13, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This week most in the healthcare IT community are recovering from the massive healthcare IT conference we know as HIMSS. The conference brings together a wide variety of people from the healthcare IT community and everyone is guaranteed to miss something that they’d find interesting and valuable. With that in mind, we’re hosting this week’s #HITsm chat to talk about what we saw and heard at #HIMSS18. Be sure to join us and share your insights and perspectives since we all no doubt had unique experiences.

As I’d done once previously, on the last day of HIMSS I hopped on video with my friend and colleague, Neil Versel who now writes at Genome Web, to talk about what we saw at HIMSS 2018. While I’m attending my 9th HIMSS, this was Neil’s 17th. So, we have some experience and perspective to offer having attended HIMSS for a combined 26 years. Enjoy our wrap up discussion on the final day of HIMSS:

What was your experience at HIMSS18? If you didn’t attend, what would you have liked to see? Did you follow along on Twitter? What do you think of the trending topics we discussed. How will they impact your business? Let us know in the comments.

#HIMSS18 Exhibitors Shift Away from Glitz & Glamour in Vegas

Posted on March 9, 2018 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He is currently an independent marketing consultant working with leading healthIT companies. Colin is a member of #TheWalkingGallery. His Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung.

The crucible that is the #HIMSS18 exhibit hall is over. 1300+ vendors have taken down their booths and rushed off to catch flights home. In the quiet aftermath of the vendor exodus, I had the chance to reflect on the overall themes of this year’s exhibits.

AI was everywhere and nowhere

Going into #HIMSS18 I fully expected that artificial intelligence would be a dominant theme. It was…and then some. AI was splashed across banners and monitors as far as the eye could see. Michael Rothman PhD, Co-founder and Chief Science Officer at Pera Health summed it up best: “Artificial Intelligence was liberally sprinkled across the #HIMSS18 show floor. It was the pixie dust that blanketed everything.”

Yet after speaking with many vendors, it became apparent to me that the term was being used very broadly to include: machine learning, data mining and rules-based workflow. Worse, a few vendors I spoke to were unable to describe how the addition of AI made their products incrementally better than what they offered before. Will “AI” go the way of neural networks, hydrogen cars and 3D TV? Doubtful, but it is concerning how quickly the term has become a marketing buzzword.

Fewer brochures handed out

In years past, you couldn’t walk down the aisles at HIMSS without vendors handing you nicely printed marketing brochures. This year, there was a noticeable lack of brochures. Several vendors had no paper handouts whatsoever, electing instead to email materials directly to booth visitors rather than force bulky paper brochures into their hands.

In my mind this is a win-win-win. The environment wins because fewer trees are transformed into glossy brochures with smiling doctors staring at computer screens. HIMSS attendees win from not having to carry heavy brochures. HIMSS exhibitors win from not having to print and ship brochures.

Fewer tchotchke’s, more in-booth experiences

One of the staples of HIMSS has been the amazing promotional items given out by vendors in the exhibit hall. This year, however, vendors scaled back their giveaways, opting instead to invest more on in-booth experiences. I counted no fewer than 20 podcasting stations and 15 video/livestream setups embedded in vendor booths. The soundproof podcast studio in the Cerner booth was amazing.

Also notable were the number of in-booth theatres that dotted the exhibit floor. I stopped counting after reaching 250. What impressed me was that it was not just sales presentations that were happening on these stages. Many vendors featured panel discussions and live interviews of industry thought leaders as part of their programs.

In my mind the hands-down winner was the CDW Healthcare Jeopardy station. Every day there was a crowd of people actively participating in a game-show style contest that pitted up to 6 teams of participants against each other. The show host was particularly charming and engaging. He really got the crowd excited. Bonus: the questions were all healthcare based.

Special shout out to @MedicaSoftLCC @FogoDataCenters @NextGate @emedapps for gathering donations for SafeNest an organization that helps victims of domestic abuse in Las Vegas.

Booth Models becoming extinct

It’s one thing to hire an entertainer like a magician or look-alike to attract people to your booth. It’s quite another to hire an attractive model to do nothing more than to stand in your booth and be attractive. At HIMSS18 I noticed very few of these hired helpers. There were certainly models who were hired to play the part of a patient in mock exam rooms, but there were no scantily-clad flamingo girls or bare-chested tuxedo men handing out company brochures like in years past when HIMSS was in Las Vegas. I’m hoping this downward trend continues.

Smaller Booths

The most surprising aspect of the HIMSS18 exhibit floor was size of the booths themselves. There were the usual giant footprints from industry titans: Epic, Cerner, Allscripts and IBM Healthcare. But other than the new Change Health booth, it felt like most vendors chose smaller booth sizes. Salesforce, Oracle, Microsoft, Google, Amazon, DellEMC and Verizon had moderately-sized booths at HIMSS18 relative to the size of those companies.

Healthcare IT has never been about glitz and glamour. Despite being held in Las Vegas – the city that is the epitome of glitz – the vendors in the #HIMSS18 exhibit hall showed restraint and practicality. Hopefully this is a trend that continues next year at #HIMSS19

10 Things I Look Forward to at HIMSS 2018 #HIMSS18

Posted on March 1, 2018 I Written By

Healthcare as a Human Right. Physician Suicide Loss Survivor. Janae writes about Artificial Intelligence, Virtual Reality, Data Analytics, Engagement and Investing in Healthcare. twitter: @coherencemed

What are you looking forward to this year for HIMSS18? Since last year I won the award for best shoes, I’m not sure how this year could be better than last. However, here are 10 reasons this year might beat the year where I won “best shoes.”

Women in Health IT Mentor Meetup

Each year HIMSS releases a report on women in healthIT included wage disparities. The release of this report and support of women in healthIT has gained traction this year. There is a HIMSS Meetup Thursday morning addressing the challenges of women in Health IT. You can register for the event and be matched with leaders. Doyenne Connections is also having a meet up before the Monday Keynote from 3- 4:30 PM at Yardbirth Southern Table & Bar. Doyenne Connections is a group dedicated to creating opportunities for women in HealthIT to make meaningful connections and networking. I really enjoy the Women in Health IT events at HIMSS.

Friendship

Catching up with friends and making new friends. I’m looking forward to seeing amazing thought leaders and finding out what they have been up to. I was going to put swag here (I actually really appreciate great swag) but really- the people I’ve met at HIMSS have been some of the best career inspirations and allies and I consider many close friends. It is also inspiring to see progress with increased access to mental healthcare and better patient communication through health IT.

I am lucky to have friends that are brilliant data scientists and working to provide better health. There is also a meetup at HIMSS for people who like #SciFi. With HealthTech Bookclub chats online we discovered that a LOT of people in HealthIT like scifi. Some of the predictions from older books that seemed to paint an impossible future now have prophetic impact from self driving cars to surgical robots. I am looking forward to meeting new friends who love data science and reading (and also swag).

Series A Pitch Competition Presentations

There is a contest at HIMSS! HIMSS VentureConnect has a pitch competition and I love contests and games. I am looking forward to the presentations and hearing more from investors about what they see as a great value proposition in HealthIT. I have seen Wellpepper for several years in the Patient Engagement space and admire Anne Weiler’s leadership as a female CEO and leader in business excellence. The pitch competition is Wednesday March 7 from 10:45 AM to 12:00 PM in Lido 3104.

Best in Klas Vendors

I have a lot of respect for the KLAS research team and I’m looking forward to meeting the vendors that are voted best in KLAS for 2018. I am planning to check out Lightning Bolt and their physician scheduling tools. Lightning Bolt helps manage physician scheduling and improve workflow. Who would you vote best in KLAS? Klas research has also started a cooperative that I am thrilled about, the arch collaborative. This group is working to improve physician satisfaction with their EMR and EHR experience.

Speaking

I get to speak!  I was lucky enough to have the opportunity to speak at HIMSS18 about physician suicide and burnout with Melissa McCool, CEO and Founder of Stellicare. I am fortunate to have the opportunity to share some of the work we’ve done in memory of my late husband. John Madsen died of suicide in 2015 and I noticed a lack of resources for our three children. Most physicians know someone that has died and there aren’t really easy ways to talk about the loss.

Please share your stories at MDSuicide.com. Yesterday we launched Sharpindex.org, collecting more information about burnout, including providing community support tools. The mission of providing a memory honoring such a personal loss is hard to talk about. I am hoping our newly forming non profit has more partners and sponsors for increasing care for physicians after HIMSS. Our session, “Physician Suicide and Clinician Engagement Tools,” takes place on March 8 at 4 p.m. PST at the Venetian Convention Center, Palazzo L.

Power Press Party

I love meeting press leaders in Health IT. On the eve of HIMSS I am looking forward to the Power Press Party. Every year we have a party celebrating great healthIT accomplishments in Media and have early meetings with vendors. If you are in the media and will be there Sunday Night- make sure you register HERE. This year it is at the Hyde Bellagio and celebrates Momcology as a charity partner. We get to celebrate the good news of HealthIT and support pediatric cancer.  The Power Press Party is Sunday, March 4 from 5:30 to 8:15 PM PST.

Telehealth Presentations

I am interested in a few presentations about Telehealth, One of them is A Framework to Support Measure Development for Telehealth with Jason Goldwater and Judd Hollander on Wednesday from 8:30-9:30 AM. The other is Behavioral Health: A Launchpad for Enterprise Telehealth with Nathaniel Lacktman and Sarah Sossong Tuesday from 4 PM to 5 PM. There are great possibilities for telehealth increasing access to providers and allowing better access to specialists. From rural populations with little access to specialists to underserved populations who need better behavioral health support, telehealth has increased access to care and will get bigger.  

Artificial Intelligence and Data Systems

Intersystems is a unified data platform for building scalable analytics platforms. They are also hosting workshops for FHIR and keynote speakers at their booth. I want to go see the presentation from Erid Widen, CEO of HBI solutions, about Predicting suicide and Opioid Abuse Using Clinical and Social Determinant Data. They are hosting this in their booth #4444 March 6 from 1 PM to 1:30 PM PST.  Innovation in Algorithms and data management is a key imperative to improving Health IT and HBI solutions has great innovations in data. If you know about companies that have great analytics I want to see what they are doing.  I will also go see CrossChx and meet their AI agent, Olive.

New Media Meetup

Some of my favorite people in HealthIT are the people who understand communication and marketing. They can translate a great algorithm to a message people understand. I call them the matchmakers, facilitating great solutions through faster connections. I’m looking forward to the New Media Meetup hosted by Care Cognitics. It is Wednesday from 6 PM to 8 PM at Senor Frogs. Register here. Communication is important in healthIT and @techguy hosts several meetups during HIMSS about the power of social media in healthcare, both to improve patient care and improve business. I go to as many of the Healthcarescene meetups as possible.

Empathy.Health

Wednesday at 4:30 Michael Joseph and Rasu Shrestha will launch Empathy.Health. Healthcare and patient leaders have observed an empathy gap, especially in the digital health arena, and believe that empathy must be a strategic and humane imperative and a core value for every health care delivery system. Physicians lose empathy during their training and frequently have a difficult time regaining that ability to relate. They will launch their work developing an increase in empathy and how to spread empathy in digital health. I am looking forward to being part of a group that recognizes the importance of healthy connections and understanding.

Those are a number of the things I’m most looking forward to at HIMSS18. What did I miss? What are you most excited to experience, see, or do at HIMSS? Let us know in the comments.

A Tribute to Larry Weed

Posted on June 20, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I must admit that I didn’t really know about Larry Weed until in 2013 I saw Neil Versel interviewing him at HIMSS. I’d been getting to know Neil Versel pretty well at this point and I saw him hit the press room full of energy and totally engaged with a man who was 89 years of age. I was new to the press room then, but I now know well the look Neil gets when he has a good interview. It’s how he looked at HIMSS 2013 when I saw him interviewing the 89 year old Larry Weed.

After the interview, I was talking with Neil and he recounted to me that he’d just been able to interview Larry Weed. I could tell that this was a real highlight for him and that he was honored by the opportunity. This month, Larry Weed passed away and Neil Versel offered up this great tribute to Larry Weed’s work.

I love this Larry Weed quote that Neil shared in his tribute:

“The worst, the most corrupting of all lies is to misstate the problem. Patients get run off into the most unbelievable, expensive procedures … and they’re not even on the right problem,” Weed said during that memorable presentation in New Orleans.

“We all live in our own little cave. We see the world out of our own little cave, and no two of us see it the same way,” he continued, explaining the wide deviation from standards of care. “What you see is a function of who you are.”

We should all take a week or so to think about the most corrupting lie of misstating the problem and how our own experiences corrupt our views.

I also didn’t know that Larry Weed was possibly one fo the founding father’s of patient empowerment. As Neil notes:

Indeed, it could be argued that Weed was a founding father of patient empowerment. Back in 1969, Weed wrote a book called “Medical Records, Medical Education, and Patient Care.” In that, he said, “patients are the largest untapped resource in medical care today.”

Larry Weed also co-developed an early EMR and the SOAP note was his idea.

I often don’t think that those of us who take healthcare IT and EHR for granted today realize the rich history and evolution of technology in healthcare. Thanks Neil for sharing a small glimpse into that history and honoring a man who was an important part in it.

Everyone should take 2 minutes and go and read Neil Versel’s full tribute to Larry Weed.

The Personalization of Healthcare and Healthcare Chatbots

Posted on April 20, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

At HIMSS 2017, I did a plethora of videos where I was interviewing people and even more where people were interviewing me. Many of those videos are just now starting to leak out onto the internet. One of those videos where I was interviewed was with the team from Availity. They had a great team there that interviewed a bunch of the HIMSS Social Media Ambassadors including me.

I’ll admit that I was pretty tired when I did this interview at the end of the day, right before the New Media Meetup at HIMSS. However, I think the interview shares some high-level views on what’s happening in healthcare IT and important topics coming out of the conference. Check out the full video to learn the details:

I like that I talked about the personalization of healthcare and then healthcare chatbots in the same video interview. Some people might see these as opposites. How can talking with a healthcare chatbot be more personal than a human?

The answer to that question has two parts. First, a chatbot can quickly analyze a lot more information to personalize the experience than a human can do. Notice that I said personalization and not personal. There’s a subtle but important difference in those two words. Second, I didn’t clarify this in the video, but the healthcare chatbot will not fully replace the care provider. Instead, it will just replace the care provider from having to do the mundane tasks that the providers hate doing. Done correctly, the healthcare chatbot will fee up the providers to be able to focus on providing patients a more personalized and personal experience. That’s something we would all welcome in healthcare.

All of this health data we are amassing on patients is going to make both the healthcare chatbot and the human healthcare provider better able to give you a personalized experience. That’s a great thing.

Since in the video I also recommended that people follow Rasu Shrestha, MD, you may also want to check out the video interview Rasu did with Availity:

I love the idea that we go to conferences to not just learn something, but to unlearn things. Rasu is great!

MACRA and MIPS Training and Resources – MACRA Monday

Posted on March 20, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is part of the MACRA Monday series of blog posts where we dive into the details of the MACRA Quality Payment Program.

While we’ve covered a lot of ground in this MACRA Monday series, there are still a lot of details we haven’t covered. I’ve been debating how deep into the weeds of MACRA and MIPS we should go or not as part of this series. We’d love to hear your thoughts.

We’re partially reticent to go really deep, because there’s a lot of great resources out there to dive deeply into MACRA and MIPS. Plus, we don’t see many people doing higher level strategic decision making content that has opinions about what your organization should or shouldn’t do when it comes to MACRA.

If you’re looking for some deeper training on MACRA and MIPS, we’ll highlight a few courses and trainings out there that we know about.

4Med MIPS and MACRA Training
The people at 4Med have a whole series of training for MIPS and MACRA. They have a lot of past experience doing training for meaningful use and PQRS and they’re continuing that with their latest MACRA and MIPS Training. Here’s a look at some of the courses they have coming up (Note: each of these links automatically gives you a discount on each course):

MACRA-MIPS Quality Project Manager – Starts March 29 – A nice course focused on the quality portion of MIPS.

Patient Centered Medical Home (PCMH) Workshop – Starts May 3 – This goes beyond MIPS and MACRA, but is all part of the related trend.

HIPAA Compliance Officer – Starts April 19 – This isn’t really a MIPS and MACRA course, but they require you to do a HIPAA Risk Assessment, so this course could help you make sure you’re ready to fulfill that requirement. Plus, this is a good course given the importance of security in healthcare these days.

4 Med offers a number of other courses including an Advancing Care Information course as well, but it’s not scheduled right now. We’ll update you in the future as those courses are scheduled. Instead of the live training options above, you can also purchase the online version of these courses. If you use the promo code: HITC you’ll get 20% off those online versions.

MIPS Boot Camp
Another option to consider is this MIPS Boot Camp course offered by Jim Tate and Wayne Singer. The course is only 1.5 hours, but Jim is a true expert in this area and so it will be a great starter course. They obviously are trying to push their MyMipsScore™ App, but that might be something useful for readers as well.

Be sure to check out all of our MACRA Monday blog posts where we dive into the details of the MACRA Quality Payment Program.

What Do Doctors Need to Know About MACRA and MIPS? – MACRA Monday

Posted on March 13, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is part of the MACRA Monday series of blog posts where we dive into the details of the MACRA Quality Payment Program.

While at the HIMSS 2017 conference, I had a chance to do a video interview with MACRA expert, Alexandria (Alex) J. Goulding, Public Policy Manager at iHealth. We cover a broad range of MACRA topics focused on the practical things that doctors should know about MACRA and MIPS.

You can find the full MACRA video interview at the bottom or click any of the links below to skip to a specific answer:

Do you have other perspectives and insights that you’d add to what Alex Goulding offered above? Please share them in the comments.

Be sure to check out all of our MACRA Monday blog posts where we dive into the details of the MACRA Quality Payment Program.

First Time HIMSS: Parker Redding, Banyan Social

Posted on March 10, 2017 I Written By

Healthcare as a Human Right. Physician Suicide Loss Survivor. Janae writes about Artificial Intelligence, Virtual Reality, Data Analytics, Engagement and Investing in Healthcare. twitter: @coherencemed

One of the main themes of HIMSS was using digital tools to manage your patient engagement and social engagement online. Banyan Social was there for their first conference introducing their digital solution for storing patient permissions to post reviews or photos online. I spoke with Parker Redding from Banyan Social. They were a first time Exhibitor at HIMSS and I wanted to hear what their impressions were from the conference.  Banyan Social is a platform with marketing tools for providers including digital storage of HIPAA forms and integration with Google reviews. From their website:  “Extend your reach and grow your practice with real-time reviews, HIPAA-compliant social media posts and automated practice listings.”

What was your first health IT conference like?

“Honestly, I thought it was pretty cool. It was almost overwhelming how many people were there. It was the biggest event I’ve ever been to. It was cool to see how many people are in the Health IT space. We were constantly busy at our booth and with how many people came to our booth we didn’t really have the opportunity to explore in depth. We are unique in the Health IT space and aren’t always the perfect fit for these database guys and those kinds of people but they were always willing to refer us to the right people and who to talk to.

One thing that I liked about this event is that even if they don’t think it’s a good fit everyone is willing to be open and have a conversation. Everyone there is trying to learn more and share knowledge it’s not just “I’m trying to get my CE credits and leave.”  It’s about learning something new – about gaining knowledge.

A lot of the people who were first time exhibitors that we talked to told us how it was crazy how big it was and how many people were there. The conference was really diverse in terms of experts from different countries.  It was cool to see the big EMR or the IBM booth and to see how much effort they put into their space.

What were your goals?

Our main goal was to create partnerships with other companies in the healthcare industry and to learn more about the healthcare IT industry and how our business fits in with this. We wanted to share our HIPAA approved social media app and how doctors/clinics can use social media and reviews to engage patients.

What was your favorite part of HIMSS?

Honestly, speaking with a pediatrician that owns multiple practices the last day and learning about why he’s been in the medical industry.  Learning about how much he cared about his patients and how he knew he could make more money in another industry. It’s amazing to see how passionate people are about healthcare and being positive. He gives up money because he’s passionate about helping with children.

What did you learn about Health IT?

Bunch of nerds.  Just kidding.  I love the nerds and the developers those are my people.

What do you wish you could do differently?

I would bring more people to have at our booth. We had a consistent flow of people stopping to talk with us that we didn’t get to spend the time we wanted to connect with other companies and learn more about the IT healthcare world. You can’t complain about having a busy booth.  I would take an Uber to the conference. Trying to find a parking spot and walking a mile to get to your booth was difficult.