Free EMR Newsletter Want to receive the latest news on EMR, Meaningful Use, ARRA and Healthcare IT sent straight to your email? Join thousands of healthcare pros who subscribe to EMR and EHR for FREE!

Will Texans Own Their DNA? Greg Abbott, Candidate for Governor, Thinks They Should

Posted on November 26, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The following is a guest post by Dr. Deborah Peel, Founder of Patient Privacy Rights.

On November 12th, Abbott released his “We the People Plan” for Texas. Clearly he’s heard from Texans who want tough new health data privacy protections.

Topping his list are four terrific privacy recommendations for health and genetic data:

  • “Recognize a property right in one’s own DNA.”
  • “Make state agencies, before selling database information, acquire the consent of any individual whose data is to be released.”
  • “Prohibit data resale and anonymous purchasing by third parties.”
  • “Prohibit the use of cross referencing techniques to identify individuals whose data is used as a larger set of information in an online data base.”

The federal Omnibus Privacy Rule operationalized the technology section of the stimulus bill. It also clarified that state legislatures can pass data privacy laws that are stronger than HIPAA (which is a very weak floor for data protections).

Texans would overwhelmingly support the new state data protection laws Abbott recommends . If elected, hopefully Abbott would also include strong enforcement and penalties for violations. Contracts don’t enforce themselves. External auditing and proof of trustworthy practices should be required.

Is this the beginning of a national trend?  I think so. The more people know about today’s health IT, the more they will reject electronic systems and data exchanges designed for the hidden use and sale of sensitive personal health data.

HIPAA and ICD-10 Courses

Posted on October 11, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

One of the real telling things I learned this week as I traveled to the MGMA Annual Conference and then the CHIME Fall Forum was how unprepared organizations are for ICD-10 and HIPAA Omnibus. It was amazing the stories I heard and I’m sure these will be topics I write about much more in the future.

One of the stories I heard was a medical practice who was asked if they were ready for ICD-10. The practice said that they were ready. Then, they were asked what they’d done to prepare for ICD-10. Their response was that their vendor said that they were ready for ICD-10.

We could really dig in to reasons why that practice might want to verify that their EHR vendor is really ready, but we’ll save that for future posts. What was amazing to me was that this practice thought they didn’t need to do anything to train their doctors and coders on ICD-10 to be ready for the change. They’re in for a rude awakening.

At a minimum, these organizations should look at a course like the Certificate of ICD-10-CM Coding Proficiency (20% discount if you use that link and discount code). The course looks at the key changes in coding with the implementation of ICD-10. Plus, it’s a course that looks to bridge your ICD-9 knowledge to ICD-10. Once you start digging into this content, you realize why your organization better have some ICD-10 training or you’re organization will suffer.

The same applies to HIPAA. So many people don’t realize (or remember) that as part of HIPAA compliance you need to have regular HIPAA training for your staff. This is particularly true with all of the changes that came with HIPAA omnibus. How many in your organization know the details of the changes under HIPAA omnibus?

An online courses like the Certified HIPAA Security Professional are such a great option since you can work on them when you have time and come back to them later while helping to protect you against a HIPAA audit. Plus, the course linked above includes a HIPAA “Business Associate Agreement” downloadable template which I’m quite sure many organizations still need. I recently asked a doctor’s office I was working with for their EHR business associate agreement. They told me they didn’t have one (more on that in future posts). Really? Wow!

Certainly each of these courses and training take some commitment to complete. Although, when your colleagues ICD-10 reimbursement becomes an issue or the HIPAA auditor knocks on your door, you’ll sleep much better knowing you’ve made the investment. Those who don’t will likely pay for it later.