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When Will Genomic Medicine Become As Common As Antibiotics?

Posted on April 29, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’m completely and utterly fascinated by the work that so many companies are doing with genomic medicine. I think that’s a good thing since I believe genomic medicine is just now starting to make its way into mainstream medicine. Plus, over the next couple years, genomic medicine is going to be a huge part of what every doctor does in healthcare. Maybe it won’t be as common as the antibiotic (what is?), but it will be extremely important to healthcare.

With that in mind, I’ve been devouring this whitepaper on the evolving promise of genomic medicine. It offers such a great overview of what’s happening with genomic medicine.

For example, they offer a great list of reasons why genomic medicine has become so important today: descreased cost of sequencing, speed of sequencing, availability of genomic tests, ways the genome can be used, reimbursement by payors, etc. That’s such a powerful cocktail of improvements. Does anyone doubt that widespread genomic medicine is near?

I also love how the whitepaper highlights the three pillars of genomic medicine: sequencing, translational medicine and personalized healthcare. That provides a great framework for starting to understand what’s happening with genomic medicine. Plus, the whitepaper offers these place where we’re seeing real benefits in healthcare: prediction of drug response, diagnosis of disease, and identification of targeted therapies. While much of this is still being tested, I’m excited by its progress.

I still have a lot to learn about genomic medicine, but the evolving promise of genomic medicine whitepaper has me even more interested in what’s happening. I’d be interested to hear what companies you think are most interesting in the genomic medicine space.

Future of EHR and the Human Genome

Posted on August 30, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Dr. West has a really interesting post up over on Happy EMR Doctor about EMR Software and the Human Genome. In the post he talks about a new program to help integrate EHR software with genome data. It’s a 4 year project, but I believe is the start of something groundbreaking.

It’s become quite clear to me over the past year that the EHRs of the future will be far more than patient records as recorded by the doctor. Instead, the EHR of the future will include a whole bunch of outside data that is collected by the patient.

Yesterday, we briefly discussed health-logging and that will be a major source of data that doctors can use to treat patients. However, probably even more powerful could be tying EHR software to a person’s genome data.

Once we understand the genome, we will likely be able to treat patients more effectively. We will be able to diagnose patients with more precision. We will be able to treat future issues before they become issues. Imagine if you could prescribe a drug that was unique to that person’s genome. Pretty cool stuff.

We are a long way from this happening, but I can clearly see that it’s the future of healthcare and the best way to leverage the genomic data is to tie it with the EHR and its clinical decision support system.

Unless someone thinks it might be better to have patients bring in their genome data on paper. Oh wait, last I checked you couldn’t do genomic tracking on paper.

EMRs and the Human Genome

Posted on I Written By

Dr. West is an endocrinologist in private practice in Washington, DC. He completed fellowship training in Endocrinology and Metabolism at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Dr. West opened The Washington Endocrine Clinic, PLLC in 2009. He can be contacted at doctorwestindc@gmail.com.

Did you know that the National Institutes of Health’s National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) is now funding grants to study how genomic information can be used along with electronic medical records?  The idea is to make it possible to have an impact on patients’ healthcare outcomes by integrating genome data with what health conditions and symptoms they have — all within the next four years.

“Our goal is to connect genomic information to high quality data in electronic medical records during the clinical care of patients. This will help us identify the genetic contributions to disease,” said NHGRI director Eric Green in a press release. “We can then equip health care workers everywhere with the information and tools that they need to apply genomic knowledge to patient care.”

So far, a pilot experiment to provide proof of principal for the research program (called eMERGE), showed that it is possible to link genetic information with complex disease states or conditions such as dementia, cataracts, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, peripheral arterial disease, white blood cell count, type 2 diabetes and heart conduction defects.

The investigators will now attempt to link genetic variations with more disease characteristics and symptoms, using genome-wide association studies (i.e. GWAS) across the entire eMERGE network.  Around 32,000 patients will be involved, and the ultimate goal would be to use the information found by linking genomic and EHR data to provide guidance for interventions such as adjusting patient medications or scheduling procedures that may ultimately help patients receive better care.  Imagine developing best practices for genetic disorders, all courtesy of your friendly neighborhood EMR/EHR!

Dr. West is an endocrinologist in private practice in Washington, DC.  He completed fellowship training in Endocrinology and Metabolism at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Dr. West opened The Washington Endocrine Clinic, PLLC, as a solo practice in 2009.  He can be reached at doctorwestindc@gmail.com.