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CMS ICD-10 Stats and Metrics

Posted on October 29, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

On October 1, 2015 health systems across the country transitioned to the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision – ICD-10. This change will enable providers to capture more details about the health status of their patients to improve patient care and public health surveillance.

CMS has been carefully monitoring the transition and is pleased to report that claims are processing normally. Generally speaking, Medicare claims take several days to be processed and, once processed, Medicare must– by law – wait two weeks before issuing a payment Medicaid claims can take up to 30 days to be submitted and processed by states. For this reason, we will have more information on ICD-10 transition in November.  .

With this in mind, CMS is continuing its vigilant monitoring process of the ICD-10 transition and can share the following metrics detailing Medicare Fee-for-Service claims from 10/1-10/27.

Metrics

October 1-27

Historical Baseline*

Total Claims Submitted

4.6 million per day

4.6 Million per day

Total Claims Rejected due to  incomplete or invalid information

2.0% of total claims submitted

2.0% of total claims submitted

Total Claims Rejected due to invalid ICD-10 codes

0.09% of total claims submitted

0.17% of total claims submitted
(estimated based on end-to-end testing)

Total  Claims Rejected due to invalid ICD-9 codes

0.11% of total claims submitted

0.17% of total claims submitted
(estimated based on end-to-end testing)

Total Claims Denied

10.1% of total claims processed

10% of total claims processed

NOTE: Metrics for total ICD-9 and ICD-10 claims rejections were estimated based on end-to-end testing conducted in 2015 since CMS has not historically collected this data. Other metrics are based on historical claims submissions.

It’s important to know help remains available if you experience issues with ICD-10:

Survey: ICD-10 Business Areas of Concern

Posted on April 30, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Each year, NueMD does a survey of providers around ICD-10. 2015 was no exception. You can see the full results of their ICD-10 survey here. They had over 1000 respondents to the survey with the majority of them coming from small practices and 43% of them coming from patient care (DO, MD, DC, NP, RN, etc).

You should take a minute to check out the full results, but this chart from the survey results really caught my eye:

ICD-10 Business Areas of Concern for Doctors

Regardless of whether you’re interested in the results or not, the list of possible areas of concern is worth considering for your organization: Training/Education, Payer Testing, Software Upgrade Cost, Claims Processing, and Compliance Timelines/Deadlines. Are any of these areas a cause for concern with your practice when it comes to ICD-10? My guess is that it has many of you concerned about the switch to ICD-10.

I was glad to see that claims processing was the biggest concern. It should be a concern for doctors and you better prepare for it to be an issue. If you don’t, it’s very likely that you could run into a cash flow issue for your practice.

All signs seem to be pointing towards no more ICD-10 delays. Although, I did hear someone tell me that Congress had 15 (at least somewhere in that range) more opportunities to slip in language to delay ICD-10 again. That’s not likely comforting for healthcare organizations out there. However, I think at this point, organizations need to assume that it’s coming and prepare accordingly. Not doing so could have some dire circumstances come October.