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Learn the Latest ACI (Advancing Care Information) Details as Required in MACRA-MIPS

Posted on March 16, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’ve been partners with 4Med for a long time and offered a wide variety of courses over the years. Many of you reading this have probably taken their HIPAA security courses or possibly one of their previous PQRS and meaningful use courses.

Of course, the meaningful use and PQRS courses have now evolved into training around MIPS and MACRA. You know how complex these can be and that’s why I’m grateful that 4Med has put together these concise courses to teach you and your practice what you need to know. Plus, as part of these courses you also get a certification and possibly CEUs (depending on which CEUs you need).

With this in mind, 4Med recently announced their next ACI (Advancing Care Information, formerly known as Meaningful Use) course along with the CMAP (Certified MACRA-MIPS ACI Professional) Certification. This is a great course for those wanting to hear the latest info from the 2018 final rule.

Here’s a full summary of topics the ACI course will cover:
* Introduction to ACI for MIPS ECs
* ACI Reporting 2018
* ACI Reporting Options for 2017
* Required Objectives for the ACI Category
* Optional ACI Objectives for ECs Using a 2015 CEHRT
* Optional ACI Objectives for ECs Using a 2014 CEHRT
* Focus on Protecting Patient Health Info
* Patient Electronic Access
* Coordination of Care Through Patient Engagement
* Health Information Exchange
* ACI Scoring

This course is a live online workshop held on April 18, 19, 25, and 26 and are led by Trisha Conway, RN, BSN, CEO and Principal Consultant at eHealth Consulting. Of course, if you can’t attend the live sessions, then they’ll be recorded and available to you after the live event as well.

If this course interests you, you can register now and save $150 off your registration thanks to Healthcare Scene’s partnership with 4Med. The promo code to get the discount is HCSEARLYBIRD150, but if you click this link the discount will be applied automatically.

There’s a Disturbance in the Force We Know as MACRA

Posted on February 13, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Yesterday Anne Zieger wrote about AAFP’s proposals to reduce the EHR Administrative Burdens and then we got this tweet from CMS Administrator Seema Verma:

That’s some really strong language from the CMS Director.

If you care about this topic, you should go and read all of Seema Verma’s tweets, but here are two more for those who don’t want to read them all:

Change is in the air it seems. Many providers are rejoicing if you look through the replies to Seema Verma’s tweets.

Dr. Ronald Hirsch asked the question that I’m sure many doctors were asking:

The short answer is no MACRA and MIPS aren’t going away. If my understanding of policy is right, Seema Verma doesn’t have the authority to make MACRA go away. That would take actions from Congress and I don’t know anyone holding their breath on that one. However, Seema can streamline the way MACRA and MIPS are implemented to make it much easier for doctors. That seems to be what’s happening now.

What will this mean for the future of MACRA? I don’t think anyone knows the answers to that question. However, what does seem clear from these tweets is that change is in the air. We’ll have to wait and see what those changes are and who influences the changes they make.

What do you think this means for MACRA and MIPS? I’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments.

Two Medical Practices’ Reactions to MACRA Ruining Healthcare

Posted on January 31, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Last week I wrote a post that discussed whether MACRA was ruining Healthcare. It’s an important discussion to have as we look at where healthcare IT legislation should go in the future.

In response to the article I got some pretty heated responses from medical practices that I thought were worth sharing with the wider audience who doesn’t get a chance to read the comments (yeah, I know that’s most of you).

The first comment is from Billy who said the following:

I wouldn’t say MACRA is ruining healthcare, but it’s starting to drive the decision train, which may be the first step.

From my corner of healthcare in America, our practice is forcing adherence to MACRA to set the tone for an ever growing portion of the workflow. The benefit from such is viewed as non-existent aside from protecting revenues. We have compliant doctors (with plenty of grumblings), but no happy ones that are doing this in the belief it’s good for medicine.

Taking two parts of your post I think I can speak towards in view of that…

“All of this leaves doctors I know upset with MACRA and MIPS. They wish it would go away and that the government would stop being so involved in their practice.”

They’re upset at the government because MACRA is seen as an intrusion with no benefit. At best, it’s a threat to their income (both to the business and their end of year salary), and at worst, they don’t trust the government entering the realm of “quality” which traditionally was limited to clinical relevancy. We’ve had plenty of internal discussions of how MACRA quality measures are worlds away from what the physicians view as truly important quality measures for their profession.

“Let’s imagine for a minute that Congress was functional enough to pass a law that would get rid of all of MACRA. Then what? Would doctor’s problems be solved?”

This doesn’t account for the primary reason MACRA was passed in the first place- controlling the costs of Medicare. They can talk about quality all they want, the government needed to eliminate the near automatic 2.5% (or thereabouts) increase in Medicare fee reimbursements. They do that with the freeze in rate increases, and making the physicians battle each other for what remains with the reward/penalty system.

Congress will never get rid of MACRA, it’s their plan to keep Medicare costs from blowing up until 2025 as the boomer generation keeps adding to the rolls.

So, MACRA is seen as having no benefit but a lot of downside in income and daily operations. About the only other thing that could have brought these emotions about would come from the IRS, but this is worse in some ways, as it’s forcing changes in clinical operations for the purpose of checking a box to protect income.

Welcome to the new normal.

It’s hard to think that Billy is right that this is the new normal. Should it be? Could we do something to make it so it’s not?

The next comment was from a long time reader who’s been commenting against MACRA and meaningful use before that (ie. a long time). Here’s meltoots’ take on the question of if MACRA is ruining healthcare:

Yep.
Count me as another mid career MD that sees the futility in any hope for the future of medicine. We are doomed. I do everything I can to talk everyone out of becoming an MD. Including my children.

We have 100% of the accountability and zero authority. Worse I am penalized by our government because I refuse to play stupid counting and clicking games. I was just discussing again (seems daily) my plans to exit this career. Too bad as I am one of only 4 orthopaedic surgeons left at our hospital. 20 years ago we had 35 on staff.

Every single person on earth seems to be saying all this data entry by MDs is silly, inefficient, useless, complex and frankly a huge costly waste of time. Everyone is speaking to burdens and the ridiculous nature of all this forced mindless data entry, super complex reporting, terrible auditing and penalizing for no good reason. When we look back a decade from now and wonder how we made medicine like the postal service, I know I can say I did try to point out better ways. But no one listened. At all.

If all these programs are so wonderful, tell me all the great things that have come out of MU, PQRS, VBM, QPP? So you got MDs to buy EHRs. Great. Everyone hates them. Great work.

HITECH set back real IT innovation in medicine at least a decade.

CMS touts patents over paperwork with absolutely no action, even worse, they made the MACRA program even more burdensome this year. AAPM, you want me to take even MORE risk, and hire more admins to run it? For 5%? Come on.

I have finally come to realization, that medicine has been destroyed by administrators, CMS /ONC, regulators, bean counters and the dozens of people I support just trying to stay ahead of the complexity. Its like the movie Office Space when I forget to click something in the 1000 clicks I have to do a day, I get 10 admins telling me about my TPS reports on what I did wrong.

What is really the worst part, is that I am pretty darned good at what I do, I am super busy and loaded with patients, too many. So I will be yet another MD, that has just had enough, that left the game in his prime. We should all be ashamed at what we did to our physicians.

MIPS Twitter Roundup – MACRA Monday

Posted on December 11, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is part of the MACRA Monday series of blog posts where we dive into the details of the MACRA Quality Payment Program (QPP) and related topics.

As we near the end of 2017, I found a number of tweets from CMS and other people that I thought would be useful to those that are interested in MACRA and MIPS.

First up is this tweet from CMS that it’s not too late to still participate in MIPS and collect some performance data before the end of 2017. This is them promoting the Test Option which would allow you to avoid the 4% penalty:

Next up is a fact sheet from CMS which outlines the different between 2017 and 2018 when it comes to MACRA/MIPS. I particularly like page 6 of the document. As you go through it, you’ll realize why 2018 is going to be much harder than 2017.

Next up is a stat from MGMA. I’d be interested in learning about the 14% of practices that think that their value-based reimbursement is going to decrease. Are these people going to direct primary care? I don’t see it going down for almost anyone. What do you think?

Finally, Matt Fisher asks a question about whether MIPS should be voluntary. I don’t think they can make it any more voluntary given the current legislation and do any of us think that congress is going to take up this topic? I don’t. So, it’s kind of a moot point. However, there is a lot of doctor angst about MIPS/MACRA. I just don’t see enough of it to really move the needle on things. I think we’re stuck with MACRA/MIPS for the forseeable future.

MIPS Penalties Include Medicare Part B Drugs – MACRA Monday

Posted on November 13, 2017 I Written By

This post is part of the MACRA Monday series of blog posts where we dive into the details of the MACRA Quality Payment Program (QPP) and related topics.

I’m sure most regular readers can tell that we’re pretty worn out and tired of MACRA, MIPS, and related government regulation. No doubt you’ll see us posting fewer MACRA Mondays going forward, but we’ll still try to cover major MACRA events as they occur. We just won’t be publishing MACRA Monday every Monday like we’ve been doing.

Jim Tate recently posted about the Real MIPS Timeline which included:

  • Phase 1 – Denial
  • Phase 2 – Shock/Anger
  • Phase 3 – Acceptance

You should read his full writeup, but he’s right. There’s a lot of denial that’s going to lead to shock and anger until the majority of healthcare have to finally accept that MIPS and MACA aren’t going anywhere.

Jim Tate also wrote another important piece related to the MIPS penalties and Medicare Part B drugs. You can read the full details of the change, but for those too lazy to click over, here’s the summary:

  • Many organizations argued that Medicare Part B Drug Costs Shouldn’t be Included in the MIPS Penalties (I mean…payment adjustments)
  • The MACRA Final rule still includes Medicare Part B drug costs (for the majority of people) in the MIPS reimbursement and eligibility calculations

If you’re a practice with a high volume of part B drugs, you better start figuring out your MIPS strategy now! Otherwise, that payment adjustment is going to hit pretty hard.

Thanks Jim for the great insights into MACRA and MIPS. If you need help with MIPS, be sure to check out Jim’s company MIPS Consulting.

MACRA Twitter Roundup – MACRA Monday

Posted on October 30, 2017 I Written By

This post is part of the MACRA Monday series of blog posts where we dive into the details of the MACRA Quality Payment Program (QPP) and related topics.

We took last week off from our MACRA Monday series of blog posts. It seems like we’re in a kind of lull period for the program. Either you’ve started collecting the data you’ve needed or you haven’t. Plus, we’re kind of waiting for the next MACRA Final rule to drop for more details.

With that in mind, I did want to see what some of the latest things that were being shared on Twitter when it comes to MACRA. I found a lot of strong opinions about the program, some good resources, and some forward-looking thoughts on what could be coming in the next MACRA final rule.


It’s hard to argue with John. Not just because he’s a smart guy, but because he’s right that it’s hard to imagine a path forward that’s fee for service and doesn’t include a shift to value based care in some form or fashion. At least given the current market dynamics.


This caution from Workflow Chuck should have us all nervous about the shift. I see a lot of healthcare organizations going after the target as opposed to the goal of value based care.


MACRA is going to impact your biz. I liked the way Kelly broke it out into 4 areas. No doubt some of these things could be argued both ways.


This is still how most doctors I know feel about MACRA and even meaningful use before it. They feel like they’ve been thrown under the bus.

Here are two forward looking resources that look at what we might get from the MACRA Final Rule:

What else are you hearing about MACRA? Would love to hear your thoughts, insights, questions, perspectives, rants, etc in the comments.

Optimizing Your EHR for MIPS and Other Quality Payment Programs – MACRA Monday

Posted on October 9, 2017 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Meena Ande currently acts as Director of Implementation for Advantum Health. This post is part of the MACRA Monday series of blog posts where we dive into the details of the MACRA Quality Payment Program (QPP) and related topics.

As quality reporting requirements ramp up under value-based payment programs like MIPS, healthcare organizations are busy retrofitting their EHRs to make way for new measures. In some settings, not much has changed by way of tech utilization since initial EHR investments were made. Many outpatient settings still lack the internal expertise needed to optimize their implementations.

The truth is many EHRs have the functionality providers need for quality reporting, but many providers don’t know that due to limited exposure to the system. Couple that stunted tech knowledge with the well documented lack of familiarity with MACRA and the recent rise of the service model in healthcare is no surprise. Many practice administrators are relying on their EHR vendor or engaging outside experts to help lead the charge on system reconfiguration to meet Quality Payment Program demands.

There are several EMR capabilities providers can take advantage of to support QPP reporting efforts. Here are a few tips to keep in mind as you customize your EHR for MIPS and other value-based models.

Don’t boil the ocean when selecting CQMs.

Most EHRs give the option of tracking more than what is required for quality reporting. Initially, track applicable measures that exceed reporting requirements. After three to four weeks you’ll know which are your strong areas. Pick the best of the litter and proceed.

Providers can be overwhelmed by too many measures, particularly in multi-specialty practice settings. While it can be difficult to find overlap in measures between specialties, taking advantage of shared metrics whenever possible can reduce reporting burdens. Sit down as early as possible and develop an EHR configuration that works for your practice’s various clinicians.

Case in Point:

A gastroenterologist and a cardiologist may work in the same multi-specialty organization and on the same EHR, but the clinical quality measures they care about differ. There is no reason to give the gastroenterologist access to the cardiology problem list in the EHR. Specialty views improve ease-of-use and support more complete documentation.

Most EHRs offer role-based and specialty-based customization. Administrators can enable or disable EHR features related to some quality measures at the practice level and sometimes at the individual provider level. Clinical quality measures are based on details about the patient, but what is captured at each point of care should be tailored to the specific provider role.

Consider the roles impacted by different CQMs.

Keep the role of the person who may be responsible for different quality measures and Advancing Care Information workflows in mind when selecting and carving out space for CQMs in your EHR. Select measures that spread reporting work across multiple roles to relieve clinicians of unnecessary burdens.         

Case in Point:

The insurance eligibility verification required under Meaningful Use is managed by the front office. Front-office staff members should be made aware of the processes they need to complete before a patient checks in, and where to document that task in the EHR.

Control what is included in MIPS denominators.

Like Meaningful Use, patient encounter volume is important under MIPS. The size of the patient pool under any given quality measure directly impacts your adherence percentage. While most primary care encounters do meet patient visit requirements under MACRA, that is not always the case in specialty settings. Clinicians can exercise some control in determining what is included in patient denominators when reporting under MIPS.

Case in point:

Some primary care visits can be omitted. Let’s say a two-physician practice sees 50 patients a day. Only 15 of those patients might be seen by a physician. The rest of the patients may be there for a simple procedure like a blood pressure screening, stress test, or echocardiogram, where quality reporting elements are not verified. Such visits should be excluded.

Evaluate your reporting paths.

MIPS offers both EHR-based and registry-based reporting paths. Most specialties can submit CQM data via their EHR while others will have to rely on paid registry reporting. Additional reporting options might include submitting through associations that member clinicians are affiliated with, or through registries created by large hospital affiliates to help related providers.

Another hurdle for clinicians is deciding whether to submit data as a group or independently. Groups interested in participating in MIPS via the CMS web interface or administering the CAHPS for MIPS survey had until June 30, 2017, to register. Beyond that, clinicians have until the March 31, 2018, MIPS submission deadline to decide whether to report independently or as a group.

Case in point:

Big groups with different levels of EHR proficiency among providers may be better suited reporting at an individual level. Individual reporting takes more time for attestation, but the advantage is that higher-performing clinicians can avoid a penalty if the group doesn’t collectively meet reporting criteria.

Each month, sample 10 percent of EHR CQM data, including instances where criteria have been met and where it has not. Catch outliers with trouble following through on processes and extend targeted training to the team members bringing numbers down.

Conclusion

Optimizing the EHR and other tech resources providers have in place can be a huge MIPS enablement factor. Up-front customization work helps providers meet reporting requirements and save time over the long run. EHR optimization also enables future value-based care initiatives and lays the groundwork for population health management programs. Gains made in EHR use benefit the life of the practice through increased efficiency and, at the end of the day, better patient care.

About Meena Ande
Meena Ande currently acts as Director of Implementation for Advantum Health where she manages Implementation of services along with EHR optimization, with emphasis on workflow management for value-based reporting.

MACRA Preparation, Are You Ready? – MACRA Monday

Posted on October 2, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is part of the MACRA Monday series of blog posts where we dive into the details of the MACRA Quality Payment Program (QPP) and related topics.

I’ll admit that the timing of this week’s MACRA Monday is a bit rough for me given the tragedy that’s occurred in my town, Las Vegas. Instead of dwelling on the tragedy and the person who could do such an awful thing, it’s been amazing even in these early hours to see how many people in Las Vegas and around the world want to and are supporting the victims of this tragedy.

We heard that there was a need for blood and thought we could help. Turns out that hundreds of others had the same idea and the blood banks have their schedules full through Wednesday. We’ll go after that to replenish the blood banks that no doubt will take a while to replenish their supply.

Thanks to everyone on Facebook, Twitter, and other social media that have reached out to myself and the rest of us that live in Las Vegas. We’re in a bit of shock and it doesn’t feel real.

To keep with our tradition of MACRA Monday, I thought I could at least share this infographic from Integra Connect on how prepared specialty practices are for MACRA:

No doubt there are a lot of healthcare organizations that aren’t ready for MACRA and they are confused on how they should be ready. Hopefully, those who have read our weekly MACRA Monday posts feel better prepared than most. MACRA is upon us whether you’re ready or not. However, MACRA certainly seems much less important on this day of mourning in Las Vegas.

On this tragic day, it’s worth noting all the incredible stories I’ve heard about Las Vegas healthcare professionals that were prepared and ready for a tragedy like this. I read stories of UMC, a major Las Vegas hospital that was so full of victims that they asked to stop bringing people to UMC that didn’t have life-threatening injuries. I read of EMS people who were at home and went into the danger to help transport victims. No doubt there will be hundreds of other stories of heroism by healthcare professionals. Many that likely won’t be heard or seen, but saved people’s lives. We thank them for their preparation, care, and work that no doubt has saved hundreds of people’s lives.

A big thank you from Vegas to each of you for all of your support.

New EHR Certification Rules Including Self-Declaration – MACRA Monday

Posted on September 25, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is part of the MACRA Monday series of blog posts where we dive into the details of the MACRA Quality Payment Program (QPP) and related topics.

Elise Sweeney Anthony and Steven Posnack recently announced on the ONC Health IT Blog two major changes to the EHR certification program. In some ways, it shows a maturity of the EHR certification program, but in other ways, it’s ONC kind of taking a more hands off approach to EHR certification.

Here are the two big changes they made:

  1. Approving more than 50% of test procedures to be self-declaration; and
  2. Exercising discretion for randomized surveillance of certified health IT products.

The first one is really fascinating since they’re making 30 out of the 55 certification criteria as “self-declaration only.” That basically means that EHR vendors will just have to claim they meet the requirements. The ONC-ACBs won’t be certifying those 30 test procedures. In many ways, it reminds me of the meaningful use self-attestation. Does that mean that ONC-ACBs will cut their costs in half? Don’t be holding your breath on that one.

Let’s just hope that most EHR vendors don’t self-certify the way eCW approached EHR certification. Although, the eCW EHR certification issues are the perfect example of why a company self certifying their EHR software or the ONC-ACB certifying the EHR software is just about the same. I haven’t seen which test procedures will be self-declared, but my guess is that it was the ones that the ONC-ACBs weren’t really doing much to test and certify anyway. Ideally, this will free up the ONC-ACBs to dive deeper into the 25 test procedures they’ll still complete so they can avoid another eCW like incident.

Some might wonder why we don’t just take the self-declared EHR certification tests altogether if there’s no one that’s going to be checking them. What those people miss is that the self-declaration still keeps the EHR vendors on the hook for properly implementing the EHR certification criteria. If it’s discovered that they claimed to be compliant but aren’t, then the government can go after the EHR vendor for false claims.

The second change has me a little more puzzled. I’m not sure why they would want to release ONC-ACBs from the requirement to randomly audit EHR certifications. Maybe they didn’t discover any issues during their random audits and so they didn’t see a need to continue them. Or maybe the ONC-ACBs said they were going to pull out as certifying bodies if the government didn’t lighten the EHR Certification load. This is all conjecture, but they could be some of the reasons why ONC decided to make this change. They did offer the following insight into their reasoning:

This exercise of enforcement discretion will permit ONC-ACBs to prioritize complaint driven, or reactive, surveillance and allow them to devote their resources to certifying health IT to the 2015 Edition.

I wonder how many complaints the ONC-ACBs have gotten about the EHR software they’ve certified. Have they just been so overwhelmed with complaints that they need more time to deal with those complaints and so audits aren’t needed? I’d be surprised if this was the case. At this point I imagine most people with EHR certification issues will be calling the whistle blower attorneys, but I could be wrong.

All in all, I don’t think these EHR certification changes are a huge deal. It’s largely a maturing of the EHR certification program and does little to help the EHR certification burden on software vendors. Maybe the ONC-ACBs will charge a little less for their certification, but that’s always been a negligible cost compared to the development costs to become a certified EHR. I’m sure the ONC-ACBs are happy with these changes though.

What do you think of these changes? Any other impacts I haven’t described above that we should consider?

Mental Health EMRs And MIPS – MACRA Monday

Posted on September 18, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

This post is part of the MACRA Monday series of blog posts where we dive into the details of the MACRA Quality Payment Program (QPP) and related topics.

Recently, I began researching the mental health EMR market on behalf of a client. I had expected to find it dwindling as a) the big EMR players have always insisted that an all-purpose EMR could be adapted to serve mental health providers effectively and b) more importantly because mental health professionals weren’t eligible for Meaningful Use payments, which presumably made them lousy sales targets for vendors.

However, my research concluded that there’s roughly a dozen mental health EMRs out there and kicking and that at least two large medical EMR vendors had bought into the mental health technology niche. (Allscripts bought a stake in NetSmart Technologies last year, and Cerner acquired Anasazi outright in 2012). With their investments, the two vendors effectively admitted that supporting mental health providers wasn’t as easy as they’d suggested.

Now, with MIPS imposing new demands on clinicians, mental health providers are likely to expect even more from mental health IT vendors, said Bob Ring, a consultant with Mica Information Systems.

Right now, few mental health EMRs defining themselves as “therapy specific” are CEHRT technology, which could become an issue if MDs on staff in a mental health setting want to meet MIPS requirements, Ring notes.

Under MIPS, psychiatrists must provide a wide range of mental health-specific data, some of which calls for specialty-related technology. For example, one category under the Clinical Practice Improvement Activity Performance Category calls for enhancements to an EMR to capture added data on behavioral health populations and use that data for additional decision-making.

But uncertified EMRs are likely to stay that way, Ring says. “Because these therapy-specific [EMRs] are generally priced very low, and it is expensive to go through the ONC certification process, it’s questionable whether many of them ever will be,” he concludes.

Not only that, things could get even trickier for both mental health clinicians and mental health EMR vendors in the future, if CMS follows through on its threat to hold therapists to the same standards as MDs beginning in 2019.

This could create chaos, however, according to my colleague John Lynn, who contends that putting mental health therapy EMRs under MIPS would be “a disaster.” Instead, mental health should not piggyback MU or MIPS, but instead, focus on incentives for mental health focused EHR incentives.

“The relationship between a mental health provider and a client is totally different than the relationship between a medical provider and their patient,” said John, whose first EMR implementation came when he rolled out a medical EMR in a health and counseling center. “Their methods of documentation are different. Their methods of billing are different. Their approach to care is different. We made it work, but it took a lot of duct tape and jerry rigging to fit it in.”