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A Next Step For Personalized Medicine? Vendor Brings Genomics To Ambulatory EHR

Posted on October 8, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

Most physicians have some sense of the value personalized medicine can bring to their practice, but I doubt that many have ready access to the tools they’d need to harness its power.

In an effort to close that gap – and of course, to make its platform irreplaceable – a vendor serving medical practices has struck a deal giving physicians the ability to order genetic tests and leverage them to improve care.

The vendor, DrChrono, offers a suite of electronic systems for physicians, including an EHR which can be customized by bundling in affiliated apps. Its new partner is Genomind, a personalized medicine platform offering genetic testing for psychiatry practices.

Physicians using DrChrono will have access to two Genomind test kits, along with some analytics tools they can use to make use of the testing data.

One of the tests is Mindful DNA Professional, a genetic test used by clinicians to help them guide wellness decisions. The test targets aspects of a patient’s genetic details which could have an impact on overall health, such as variants suggesting that they could have sleep issues or a predisposition to anxiety, depression or impaired cognition.

DrChrono users will also have access to the Genecept Assay, the results of which can guide the treatment of psychiatric conditions. Once test results become available on the Genomind system, doctors can use its gene-drug-environmental interaction tool, the Genomind Drug Interaction Guide, to inform their treatment decisions. With the help of the Guide, clinicians can analyze the patient’s current medication regimen and flag gene-drug interactions.

An interesting side note to all of this is that the final test results from Genomind will be stored in the DrChrono information library for the patient and become part of the patient’s medical record.

Looked at one way, sharing the Genomind test results seems almost like a no-brainer in a world where casual genetic testing (think 23andMe) is becoming the norm. On the other, though, I don’t want to gloss over the fact that using genetic data to search for relatives is one thing and putting it into your personal medical record is quite another. It suggests that of consumer-driven demand for precision treatment is maturing, and that Genomind is on the right side of this trend.

This takes me back to DrChrono, which while not itself reinventing the wheel has struck a smart deal here. Not only has it brought a tool on board which could offer some benefit to physicians, its supporting the collection of information (genetic data) that patients are beginning to want. If DrChrono can give patients their genetic info via a decent portal, the company may find itself to be in demand with patients. Way to stay abreast of the times.

Psychiatry Meaningful Use Videos

Posted on September 14, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I probably should post these on my EMR and EHR videos website, but since they can’t be embedded I figured I’d just post about them on here.

The company Valant Medical Solutions has posted 4 videos that go through the various meaningful use requirements. Of course, I’m sure that many of you are thinking that’s not all that interesting. Plus, the videos are quite specific to the Valant EHR solution. You’re right on both accounts.

There are a number of reasons I’m posting them anyway. First, I always find it interesting to see how an EHR vendor is trying to help their doctors achieve meaningful use. Second, the principles of meaningful use are the same regardless of EHR vendor so even if the details are specific to the Valant EHR you can still learn about the details of meaningful use. Third (and maybe most important), these are the first videos that I’ve seen address meaningful use for psychiatry.

Hopefully all you psychiatrists out there that want to show meaningful use of your EHR will take a look and get some value out of these videos.

Behavioral Health EMRs: A Small Sampling

Posted on February 8, 2011 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. Contact her at @ziegerhealth on Twitter or visit her site at Zieger Healthcare.

In theory, any medical practice-friendly EMR could be adapted for use in a behavioral health setting.  (That’s my theory, at least.)  But as with other specialties, there’s a growing list of vendors who are offering EMRs focused on behavioral health.

Since we’re not finding any comprehensive sources of such vendors out there, we thought we’d share a  very small sampling of those we could find and see if you have any feedback. Yes, there’s probably of hundreds of vendors who claim to support psych, but we hope these few help to start a discussion.

If our quick look is any indication, there’s no single model or feature set that’s won over the psych marketplace.  Here’s hoping it matures soon;  right now my guess is that these would be a nightmare to integrate into a shared HIE.

Are any of you using an EMR specific to behavioral health? How is it working out? Have we left any important vendors out (including non-specialized platforms which seem to work well in psych settings)?

We look forward to your feedback!

-Anne

* Acrendo (http://www.acrendo.com/psychiatry-emr)  Tablet PC-based EMR.   Features include mental health templates, appointment setting, Dragon-based dictation and e-prescribing.

* ICANotes (http://www.icanotes.com/) Web-based EMR focused on psychiatry/psychology practice. Supports sub-specialities, including child/adolescent, substance abuse, eating disorders and geropsychiatry.

* OmniMD Psychiatric EMR (http://www.omnimd.com/html/SpecialtyPsychiatry.html) Includes mental health intake and depression/anxiety exam.

* Psychnotes EMR (http://www.psychnotesemr.com/)  Available as hosted or installed solution. Company specializes in psychiatric products. Supports speech and handwriting recognition.

* Psytech Solutions (http://www.psytechsolutions.com)  Offers Epitomax, a hosted EMR whose features include scheduling and billing.

*  Sigmund Software (http://www.sigmundsoftware.com)  Described as “an enterprise management software application for human service agencies.” Features include target behavior tracking.

*  Valant Psychiatric EMR (http://info.valantmed.com/) Hosted EMR also featuring billing and e-prescribing.

* Qualifacts (http://www.qualifacts.com/)