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Healthcare IT Data Entry Takeaways

Posted on January 23, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I was looking over Rock Health’s writeup of the Health Innovation Summit. A lot of the post is more about what happened as opposed to what was said, but there were some really interesting takeaways that stuck out to me from the Form Reform: Data Entry for Humans session by Jackson Wilkinson. Here’s the section on it:

Jackson Wilkinson, Co-founder of WeSprout, gave attendees practical advice for data entry. Data is an important part of the healthcare equation, but input design is blocking progress. Quick take-aways: Don’t ask for anything you don’t need; whatever you request, return the favor in spades; make it fast, accurate, and simple. And don’t forget: The best form is the one you never have to fill out.

The money phrases:

Input design is blocking progress
and
Whatever you request, return the favor in spades
and
The best form is the one you never have to fill out.

While I’m quite sure this presentation had to do more with consumer health IT than EMR and EHR software, I think there’s a lot that could be learned from these comments by EMR companies. Far too many EHR companies believe that they have their users captive and so they can ask whatever they want of their users. Sure, they’d never admit this out loud, but when you look at their EHR software and the design, you realize that they weren’t focusing on the above points very well.

As I think about these points, I’m taken back to a visit to San Francisco where I met with the founders of Elation EMR, Conan and Kyna. I absolutely loved their laser focus on stripping out the unneeded extras in their EMR software. They talked about becoming a certified EHR and handling ePrescribing and how they literally had to work tirelessly to make meaningful use of a certified EHR a seamless experience that didn’t place an undue burden on the provider. I saw this same focus through every part of their approach to EHR software development. I haven’t seen their software in a while so I don’t know how well they’ve followed through on this focus, but I’m interested to see it again to find out.

Is it Real or Is it Memorex….mHealth Summit Style #mhs11

Posted on December 6, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This is my first time attending the mHealth Summit. In past years, I’ve seen the flood of tweets that have come out of past mHealth Summit events and so I knew this year I had to be here. This year’s event doesn’t have a keynote like they had last year in Bill Gates, but it’s been a good event. If I remember right, I’ve heard they have 300 exhibitors and 2600 attendees. I heard in the halls someone saying that they thought the attendance at the event was a little disappointing, but of course that was just from someone in the hall. It’s still a growing event and I think one of the best signs for the event is HIMSS (and now mHIMSS) involvement in the event as well. Wait until the HIMSS machine gets rolling and I think the event will be even better.

One conversation I’ve heard a number of times at mHealth Summit is whether the companies we’re seeing here are real or whether they won’t be around for long. Basically, are these shells of ideas that don’t really have great sustainable business models.

I’m a little torn by the discussion. Mostly because there’s little doubt that many of the companies that are here are going to fail. Particularly because there are at least 40 companies in the nicely done mHealth Startup pavillion. Depending on the numbers you prefer, something like 9 out of 10 startups fail. This isn’t conjecture, it’s basically fact. So, many of these companies will fail, but quite frankly that’s a pretty healthy part of the environment. We want creative individuals that are doing things that may or may not work out. There are thousands of HUGE companies around today that first started out as outrageous ideas.

I heard one person comment that mHealth Summit has a lot more people working together and seeing how they can build their ideas. They contrasted this with the also popular Health 2.0 event in San Francisco where they said many people were too interested in comparing how much money each company had raised. That seems like a pretty apt description of the difference between Washington DC and Silicon Valley to me so it shouldn’t be all that surprising.

All in all, those who say that mHealth is dead or won’t be around for long are off base in my book. The move to mobile is going to happen and mobile technology will play a huge role in healthcare going forward. I could certainly agree with some people that mobile health might one day just become ubiquitous with Healthcare IT. In fact, we see signs of that already, but that doesn’t change the fact that mobile will be huge in healthcare.

One division I do see happening in the mobile health space is the division into two areas: mobile health for industry professionals (ie. doctors, nurses, etc) and mobile health for consumers. At least in the US, I think we’ll see more distinction between those two areas over time.